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Particles vs Waves

  1. Aug 29, 2010 #1
    What are the major differences between the properties of waves and those of particles?
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 30, 2010 #2
    What do you think are the major differences?
  4. Aug 30, 2010 #3
    Is that a school test problem?
  5. Aug 30, 2010 #4
    I'm just looking to see if anyone can provide a clearer answer than the mess of information on wikipedia.
  6. Aug 30, 2010 #5
    OK, maybe you can start by listing some "properties" of waves. Understand what a wave nature is.
  7. Aug 31, 2010 #6


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    Wikkers isn't the sole source of information, you know. There are hundreds of web pages that discuss this. I suggest you 'compare and contrast' a few of them.

    And, there is no paradoxical relationship between waves and photons if you avoid the dreaded (and pointless) question "yeah but what is it REALLY?". Because it isn't anything "really" it's just what we happen to observe.
  8. Aug 31, 2010 #7
    If your question was intending some straight answers then ,

    -particles are the components of physically existing substance like air , water , solids etc that can be felt or touched.
    -wave is the pattern in which the particles move. eg ripple wave in water, sound wave in air.

    You can define them but they aren't comparable entities. It would be like differentiating between light and sun.

    We could rather compare particle waves with electromagnetic waves.
    I understand till the particle wave but electromagnetic wave has been brainstorming me for a long time as well.

    I guess you are also intending to get answer to this question though you have presented it the other way.
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