Patients is the key to understanding principals

  • Thread starter Kirk Gaulden
  • Start date
In summary, on the Physics Forums, the conversation began with Kirk offering help and sharing the time and location of his post. Alexander then makes a joke about homonyms and Warren criticizes the appropriateness of the thread's title. Kirk responds with a statement about having a hobby and trying out theories, to which Warren responds with disdain. The conversation shifts to discussing temperatures and Planck scales, with Marcus asking for the temperature at the core of the sun. Chroot makes a negative comment about Kirk, which is then defended by NEOclassic. Finally, the conversation ends with an update on the temperature and NEOclassic summarizing the negativity in the conversation.
  • #1
Kirk Gaulden
Morning here, 7:40 am.

If anyone has any questions, I would be happy to help.
 
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  • #2
Originally posted by Kirk Gaulden
Morning here, 7:40 am.

If anyone has any questions, I would be happy to help.

Morning to you, it is quarter past 7 pacificdaylight
and most gracious of you to offer us the opportunity
to ask questions, so I ask you what is the temperature
outside in Harlem Georgia rated on the universal absolute
scale you get by setting
c=G=hbar=k=1


[273 kelvin is 1.93E-30 on the Planck scale, to save the
trouble of looking it up]
 
  • #3
Marcus, do you think people here can't do proportions?
 
  • #4
of course not

Originally posted by Alexander
Marcus, do you think people here can't do proportions?

No. Why would you think that?
What is the temperature where you are, Alexander.
(I mean on the c=G=hbar=k=1 scale.)

Outside here it is 2E-30
a chilly morning

I am assuming that it is completely effortless
for you to do proportions, or else i wouldn't ask :-)
 
  • #5
Originally posted by Kirk Gaulden
Morning here, 7:40 am.

Hi Kirk,
Does your title mean: Patients are the key to understanding Doctors!
or: Students are the key to understanding Principals!
or: patience is the key to understanding principle!

Just kidding Kirk - I also have trouble with homonyms all the time but I seldom see what appears to be a double doodle. Cheers, Jim
 
  • #6
I wonder how long this lunatic is going to be allowed to remain here. This thread obviously does not belong in the Physics forum.

- Warren
 
  • #7
Oh, and by the way -- the title of this thread should read:

"Patients are the key to understanding principals."

On the other hand, I'm not really sure why patients (usually found in hospitals) would help one understand principals (usually found in schools), but well -- that's what you're supposed to explain to us, right?

- Warren
 
  • #8
I appreciate the fun guys, and correct about the homonyms,
forgive my ignorance. This is a hobby for me, I''m just trying out my theories on you to see how the reflection of the mirror looks.
 
  • #9
Originally posted by Kirk Gaulden
This is a hobby for me
On the other hand, some of us are professionals. You'll just end up making yourself look (more) stupid.
I''m just trying out my theories on you to see how the reflection of the mirror looks.
Really, and I mean this with conviction: No one cares about your theories. I've read enough of your posts in other threads to suspect that you have some kind of brain damage.

- Warren
 
  • #10


Originally posted by marcus
No. Why would you think that?
What is the temperature where you are, Alexander.
(I mean on the c=G=hbar=k=1 scale.)

Outside here it is 2E-30
a chilly morning

I am assuming that it is completely effortless
for you to do proportions, or else i wouldn't ask :-)

We all learned them in 6th grade, right? So, if 0 C is 1.93x10-30 then my 10 C is obviousely 2.00x10-30.

By the way, you miss two significant digits in your 2E-30 temperature. 2E-30 means that your temperature is anything from -60 C to +73 C.

So, what is you temperature anyway?
 
  • #11


Originally posted by Alexander
We all learned them in 6th grade, right? So, if 0 C is 1.93x10-30 then my 10 C is obviousely 2.00x10-30.

Bravo Alexander. In fact 10 celsius was the temperature here this morning too----I wrote 2x10-30, not wishing to be precise, but had I wanted more accuracy I could have said 2.00x10-30.

One more temperature in Planck terms please: what is the approximate temperature at the core of the sun, on a scale where c=hbar=G=k=1?
I feel that one significant figure is adequate here, it is really the order of magnitude that matters but one or two figure accuracy would be nice.

You clearly don't need to use "6th grade" proportions. Planck energy is sqrt (hbar c5/G). And Planck temperature is the energy divided by Boltzmann k
 
  • #12
"lunatic" forbidden in PF

Originally posted by chroot
I wonder how long this lunatic is going to be allowed to remain here. This thread obviously does not belong in the Physics forum.

- Warren
Shame on you Warren, for your unnecessary remark. Kirk's offer to give help to those of us who do not already know everything, should not be condemned in ANY forum. Greg will be disappointed that you stooped to calling his multitude of happy denizens by negative names.
 
  • #13
More bad day!

Originally posted by chroot
Oh, and by the way -- the title of this thread should read:
"Patients are the key to understanding principals."
- Warren
Sorry Warren, that your bad day continues. You should remember that Kirk's intended "patience" meaning "calmness" really sounds ridiculous when restated: calmness are the key to understanding principles.
 
  • #14
more stupid and brain damage are negative

Originally posted by chroot
On the other hand, some of us are professionals. You'll just end up making yourself look (more) stupid.

Really, and I mean this with conviction: No one cares about your theories. I've read enough of your posts in other threads to suspect that you have some kind of brain damage.

- Warren

Will your bad day never end? As I recall in another forum your bad attifude there caused me to come over here. This is a good forum that welcomes many school and college students who are curious about this forum and wish merely to help non-professional younger students. Again I repeat that your post really contributes nothing but hatred against those less educated than you.
 
  • #15


Originally posted by NEOclassic
Will your bad day never end? As I recall in another forum your bad attifude there caused me to come over here. This is a good forum that welcomes many school and college students who are curious about this forum and wish merely to help non-professional younger students. Again I repeat that your post really contributes nothing but hatred against those less educated than you.

Hello N'classic, it is another cold morning here and the temperature is 2E-30.

What is it in Carrolton Texas? (I mean on the c=hbar=G=k=1 scale)
Where is Carrolton anyway?
 
  • #16


Originally posted by NEOclassic
Shame on you Warren, for your unnecessary remark. Kirk's offer to give help to those of us who do not already know everything, should not be condemned in ANY forum. Greg will be disappointed that you stooped to calling his multitude of happy denizens by negative names.
Kirk's a crackpot. He doesn't know anything, and isn't in any position to "help" anyone. <ADMIN EDIT> A spade is a spade.

- Warren
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #17


Originally posted by marcus

One more temperature in Planck terms please: what is the approximate temperature at the core of the sun, on a scale where c=hbar=G=k=1?
I feel that one significant figure is adequate here, it is really the order of magnitude that matters but one or two figure accuracy would be nice.

You clearly don't need to use "6th grade" proportions. Planck energy is sqrt (hbar c5/G). And Planck temperature is the energy divided by Boltzmann k [/B]

I know what plank values are. But too lazy to use hard way of doing things. So, if room temperature (=25 meV) is about 2E-30, then Sun's 1-1.3 KeV is obviousely about 1E-25.
 
  • #18


Originally posted by Alexander
We all learned them in 6th grade, right?
Actually, I skipped that grade, but isn't
that a bit advanced for 6th grade ? :wink:
 
  • #19
I don't have 6th grade text with me, but here is 7-grade algebra content (I found dusty textbook on my shelf and have it right in front of me):

Ch1: Expressions, equations, equalities.
Ch2: Functions and their graphs.
Ch3: Powers and exponents.
Ch4: Polynoms and their factoring.
Ch5: Formulas for quick multiplication (powers of binom).
Ch6: Systems of linear equations.


So, proportions were indeed studied either in 6th or even in 5th grade.
 
  • #20
Originally posted by Alexander
Ch1: Expressions, equations, equalities.
Ch2: Functions and their graphs.
Ch3: Powers and exponents.
Ch4: Polynoms and their factoring.
Ch5: Formulas for quick multiplication (powers of binom).
Ch6: Systems of linear equations.
Functions and their graphs in the 7th grade ?
I'd wish they taught me that stuff for so
long... :frown:
 
  • #21
Yes, functions and their graphs in 7th grade. (Example of functions: linear, parabolic, cubic parabolas, hyperbolas).

But this is russian 7th grade textbook (which is similar to many european texts). I am not sure what they study in math in 7th grade in US. May be, you can tell?
 

Related to Patients is the key to understanding principals

What does "Patients is the key to understanding principals" mean?

This phrase means that being patient is essential in order to fully understand and grasp important principles or concepts.

How does patience help in understanding principles?

Patience allows us to take the time to carefully absorb and analyze information, which leads to a deeper understanding and retention of principles.

Why is it important to have patience in science?

In science, patience is crucial because it takes time and careful observation to conduct experiments, collect data, and draw accurate conclusions. Rushing through the process can lead to errors and inaccurate results.

What are some ways to practice patience in scientific research?

Some ways to practice patience in scientific research include setting realistic timelines, taking breaks when feeling frustrated, and being open to unexpected outcomes or delays in experiments.

How can patience benefit scientists in their work?

Patience can benefit scientists by allowing them to remain calm and focused even when facing challenges or setbacks, leading to better problem-solving and more accurate results. It also promotes careful thinking and attention to detail, which are essential qualities in science.

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