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Peeing on the fence

  1. Oct 12, 2011 #1
    Think about it. How much drinkable good water would we save in America if we all peed outside. I haven't come up with a formula yet. I don't mean standing on the front porch at noon and letting it go but privacy enclosures could be built. There must be close to five gallons in a toilet tank. So each person flushes maybe 5 times a day times how many people in the USA? Las Vagas has made a lot of progress in water saving over the last few years.
     
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  3. Oct 12, 2011 #2

    marcus

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    In N california we periodically have water shortages and people are asked to save water. sometimes rates are adjusted to encourage this. If you stay below a certain level you get a special rate.

    State institutions then let their lawns get brown and people take various measures.

    Often people let the toilet go unflushed if there is just pee. they might then let it go overnight and flush it in the morning.

    Some people rig "greywater" systems to selectively run laundry water (or bath water) out into the garden.
    ================

    Something I heard about from Europe: Toilets with two distinct flush modes.
    One mode uses less water. That seems reasonable. I have no direct experience and don't know how much the better-engineered more efficient units cost.
     
  4. Oct 12, 2011 #3

    davenn

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    There are lot of public urinals in Australia that no longer flush
    They use small chemical blocks to control breakdown of minerals in the pee and
    to control the smell. Seems to work. dunno what effect those chemical blocks have on
    the enviroment. But at least ther is more water in a country that has a climate that is drying out

    cheers
    Dave

    PS ... As to your subject title ... Just make sure its NOT an electric fence!! haha
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  5. Oct 13, 2011 #4

    Ryan_m_b

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    The water isn't really wasted is it? It just enters the cycle again. The real problems are;

    1) Ensuring that water supply is efficient and cost effective (we had a drought in south east England a few years ago and there was a scandal when it was discovered that for years water companies had known about leaky pipes but solved the problem by just pumping more water through the ground).

    2) Ensuring that there are enough reservoirs and waste recycling plants to deal with water shortages.
     
  6. Oct 13, 2011 #5

    AlephZero

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    You can get "retrofit kits" to modify existing toilets quite cheaply. Google says they are available in the USA. The basic idea is the flush handle operates in opposite directions for full and half flush.

    The cheapest version of this is just to reduce the volume of the header tank by putting a few bricks in it, and then flushing twice when you have to!
     
  7. Oct 13, 2011 #6

    marcus

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    A lot of places water is treated and then goes into a salt water bay or ocean. Or it goes into some muddy river or lake with stuff in it you wouldn't want to drink. So you can't immediately reuse it for anything.

    If treated water goes into salt water ocean, for example, you have to wait until it evaporates into clouds and comes back as rain. You are right that it "enters the cycle again" but the cycle depends on further rainfall.

    In terms of your "efficiency" criterion, it makes a lot of sense for people just not to use clean water unnecessarily. It is one of the cheapest ways to improve efficiency.

    I am currently using laundry greywater in the back yard---for the plants growing there. It's kind of an experiment. The plants seem to be getting along all right so far. We have had some fall hot spells and they are probably glad to get any water they can :biggrin:
     
  8. Oct 13, 2011 #7

    DaveC426913

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    And then what? It would run down a rivulet to the street where it would pool?

    Do you know how long it took civilization to discover that raw sewage and heavily populated areas is a bad combination?

    How do you get that urine to go further than the street curb?
    You provide pipes. Underground pipes.
    You flush it with a liquid to move it to a waste processing plant.
    Huzzah! The modern sewage system.
     
  9. Oct 13, 2011 #8

    turbo

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    I bought and installed one of these when our old toilet crapped out. There are two chromed buttons in the tank lid with "braile" bumps on them, so you can flush by feel. It was made by American Standard, and though the flush valve is plastic-bodied, it seems to be well-designed.

    It was a well-advised investment because we get our domestic water from a drilled well, and our "sewer system" is a septic tank and a leach field. I thought it best to take load off the well and the septic. The neighbors' grand-kids love the toilet and always seem to "have to go" when they come to visit - a bit of novelty.

    http://www.americanstandard-us.com/products/productDetail.aspx?id=2055 [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  10. Oct 13, 2011 #9

    lisab

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    Hear, hear. I can imagine how the place would smell during a heat wave :yuck:.
     
  11. Oct 13, 2011 #10

    lisab

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    :rofl:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  12. Oct 22, 2011 #11
    To conserve water when I moved into my house 13.5 years ago, I filled two plastic 2 liter soda bottles with water and placed one in each of the two toilet tanks in my house. Next, I adjusted both of the tank floats to fill just halfway. So each tank is actually only holding about 2 gallons of flushable water (as about a quart sits below the flapper seat and the 2-liter soda bottle displaces at least a quart).

    To further conserve water, I partially closed the cold water main to reduce the flow rate. On top of that, I take military-type showers (water turned on only long enough to wet down, then turned on again just long enough to rinse off), which only uses 2 or 3 gallons of water at best. This has worked superbly for me. Yes, I live alone, so there’s no one to complain about the water pressure being too low.

    My water bill came just yesterday. I used a total of 300 gallons of water for the month, and that includes doing my laundry several times a month and conservatively washing dishes by hand. Cost of water for the month, $2.39. Naturally, I can’t beat the far more costly monthly customer charge, but at least I’m doing my part to conserve on water usage. I hate to see anything wasted needlessly. You’d likely be amazed by how much I reduced my natural gas heating bill last year during our coldest month, February.
     
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