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Peltier's Effect

  1. Aug 25, 2006 #1
    It occurs when a current is passed through two dissimilar metals or semiconductors (n-type and p-type) that are connected to each other at two junctions (Peltier junctions). The current drives a transfer of heat from one junction to the other: one junction cools off while the other heats up; as a result, the effect is often used for thermoelectric cooling.

    can it be possible
    that we heat on ened
    thus cool the other and thus producing electricity??
    i need urgent answers
    thanyu for your co-operation
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 25, 2006 #2

    NoTime

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    Yep. Works both ways.
     
  4. Aug 25, 2006 #3

    Gokul43201

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    And the inverse phenomenon is called the Seebeck Effect.
     
  5. Aug 26, 2006 #4
    could you please elaborate on how it works both way
    can an experiment be performed to prove this???
     
  6. Aug 26, 2006 #5

    NoTime

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    You could try looking http://www.peltier-info.com/
    The experiments are simple enough that you could do them yourself.
     
  7. Aug 26, 2006 #6

    Gokul43201

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    Heard of a thermocouple?
     
  8. Aug 27, 2006 #7
    yes
    thermocouples
    but i dont really know much about them
    could you tell me
    examples
    sb-bi
    fe-cu
    ag-au
     
  9. Aug 27, 2006 #8

    Gokul43201

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    We've given you lots of keywords. Have you tried Googling any one of them?

    If you have a specific question about something you don't understand from all your reading, we can help clarify your doubt. If you need help with being pointed to good references aimed at a particular level, we could do that too. If you want us to write up treatises on subjects that you haven't put the effort of researching yourself, you'll find very little help.

    Start here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peltier-Seebeck_effect
     
  10. Aug 28, 2006 #9
    i did search and see and obtain all the inoformation
    thank you
     
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