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Periodic Table Of Personalities

  1. Jun 20, 2005 #1
    PERIODIC TABLE OF PERSONALITIES

    Myers - Briggs’ 16-type Personality Indicator is based on Jung’s four categories of people with two types in each (Myers & McCauley, 1985). David Kersey (1978, 1995, 1998) randomly arrives at sixteen different personality configurations which he claims correspond to those of Myers. Kersey considers brain to a computer with temperament as its physical base or hardware, and character its software. Then, temperament is a configuration of pre-dispositional inclinations and character is an array of dispositional habits, that emerges from the physical base as individual attitudes and actions.

    Personality is a complex configuration of functions pertaining to both nature and nurture (Coan 1994; Schwartz, et al 1995; Oldham & Morris 1991). Setting natural limits to these functions, may significantly help to systematize the relationships of personal inclinations and predispositions.

    *Self * is a limiting human singularity. At its zenith is the Super-self which is an ultimate state. It is not merely an attribute or claim or the Freudian Super-Ego, but the god-man, as it were. The use of this term is no less secular than the mundane use of the word "spiritual". To be sovereign is another limit and at its nadir is the lowliest servant. These are singularities that depict finite human bounds or limiting tendencies.

    Thus, there seems to be four "archetypical’ bounds within which people exist and function; two are *state* and the other two *status* limits. Super-self and Self are *state* limits. Sovereign and Servant are *status* limits. State and Status are both natural endowments, though status is more amenable to nurture.

    Within each of these temperamental limits of nature, there are three possible types of dispositions for nurture. The Super-self manifests in one of three coequal levels:

    1. Spiritual/Ethical/Moral (S) 2. Mental /Cognitive (M) 3. Natural/Physical (N) . The Self operates predominantly in one of three modes: 1. Thinking (T) 2. Feeling (F). 3. Acting/Behavioral (B). The Sovereign status exercises control in one of three ways:

    1. Authoritative (A) 2. Authoritarian (R) 3. Permissive (P). The Servant status prefers one of three styles: 1. Compliant (C). 2. Assertive(V) 3. Aggressive (G). All these are familiar terms in psychology. Each individual personality is a composite configuration

    of these limiting predispositions and propensities. Table1 sums up the twelve types.

    Table: 1 CATEGORIES TYPES

    1. Super-self i. Spiritual (S); ii. Mental (M); iii. Natural (N)

    2. Self i. Thinking (T); ii. Feeling (F); iii. Acting(B)

    3. Sovereign i. Authoritative (A); ii. Authoritarian (R); iii. Permissive (P)

    4. Servant. i. Compliant (C); ii. Assertive (V); iii Aggressive (G).

    These constitute eighty-one different combinations of personality types as follows: The types in the Super-self and Self are paired, giving ST, SF, SB; MT, MF, MB; NT, NF, NB. Each of these 9-pairs combines with each possible pair of types in the two Sovereign and Servant, yielding PG, PC, PV; RG, RC, RV; AG, AV, AC. Thus NB will have the following 9-types. NBPC, NBPG, NBPV, NBRC, NBRG, NBRV, NBAC, NBAG, NBAV. This is the Base group. The 9-types under ST is the Noble group: STPC, STPG, STPV, STRC, STRG, STRV, STAC, STAG, STAV. All the other types fall in between. with a total of 81 types. These form 8 major A groups, each with a subgroup B, similar to the Periodic Table of Elements. See Table 2 (at the bottom). Periods (Status Functions)

    The horizontal groups reflect the lifespan development of personality. Eric Erickson’s (1963, 1968, 1980, 1986)eight stages seem most appropriate here. Period 1 is birth to one year when the child may act as a *PG* -a permissive sovereign and an aggressive servant (Trust Vs. Mistrust). Period 2 covers ages 1-3 when the child is *PV* -a permissive sovereign and an assertive servant (Autonomy vs. Shame/Doubt). The child permits certain basic training but is assertive. Period 3 *PC* is 3-6 years of permissiveness and compliance (initiative vs. guilt). Period 4 *RV* is 6 years to puberty of authoritarian sovereign and assertive servant (Industry vs. Inferiority). Period 5 is *RG* - adolescent, authoritarian sovereign and aggressive servant (Identity Vs. Role Confusion). The RC subgroups in this period show autonomy and compliance. Period 6 is *AG*- young adulthood of an authoritative sovereign and aggressive servant (Intimacy Vs. Isolation). Period 7 is *AV* of middle adulthood, the settled life of authoritative king and assertive servant (Generativity vs. Stagnation). Period 8 is *AC* Adulthood Proper (not given by Erickson), the noble authoritative sovereign and compliant servant, of balance and poise. Group 8B is late adulthood ( Integrity Vs. Despair). SBRC is active/acquiescent, *SFRC* is sensitive/co-operative, *STRC* is reflective/agreeable, but autocratic and controlling. See Table 3-4.

    Table 3 Status Functions of Personality

    Periods/ Stages: Characteristics Erickson

    PG: Permissive-Aggressive Period 1 Infantile, Hedonistic Trust vs. Mistrust

    PV: Permissive -Assertive Period 2 Childish, Relational Autonomy vs.Shame

    PC: Permissive-Compliant Period 3 Conformist, Social Initiative vs.guilt

    RV: Authoritarian-Assertive Period 4 Enterprise, Egotistic Industry vs. Inferiority

    RG: Authoritarian-Aggressive Period 5 Idealist, Risk-taking Identity/Role Confusion

    AG: Authoritative-Aggressive Period 6 Innovative, Aggressive Intimacy vs. Isolation

    AV: Authoritative-Assertive Period 7 Realistic, Insight Generativity/Stagnation

    AC: Authoritative-Compliant Period 8 Poise, Balance Integrity vs. Despair

    RC: Authoritarian-Compliant Period 5 B-Groups (IB-VIIIB) Table 4. State Functions of Personality

    Groups CharacteristicsGroup I A/B NB. Natural/ Behavioral. Physical / Sensorial. Infantile Sensory

    Group II A/B NF: Natural/Feeling. Physical / Emotional. Dependent Receptive

    Group III. A/B NT: Natural /Thinking. Physical / Intellectual. Investigative Alert

    Group IV A/B MB: Mental/Behaving. Cognitive /Sensorial. Judicious Sensual

    Group V A/B MF: Mental/Feeling Cognitive/Emotional. Idealistic Reactive

    Group VI A/B MT: Mental/Thinking Cognitive/Intellectual. Rational Responsive

    Group VII A SF: Spiritual/Feeling: Discerning/Emotional Emotive Romantic

    Group VII B SB: Spiritual/Behavioral Discerning/Sensorial Activist Pro-active

    Group VIII A ST: Spiritual/Thinking Discerning/Intellectual Inventive

    Group VIII B (SBRC, SFRC, STRC) Cognitive-Emotive Reflective

    Alternatively, the *status* configurations could be the vertical groups and the state configurations the horizontal periods. That may yield a table for abnormal personality types, where predispositions dominate dispositions throughout the life span. For Dr. Oldham, the personality disorders (DSM IV, 1994 pp. 417-432) are extreme manifestations of normal personality traits and behaviors. Millon & Davis (1996) holds a similar view. Individual Inclination Check List - I:

    In each set of three in Table 5, check the word that seems most befitting you, even if all the three may appeal to you or none of them will be particularly preferable. Answer as fast as possible across the table. First impression is the best indicator. Count the checks in each column and circle the alphabet at the bottom of the column with the highest score. Write the four alphabets below. This is your personality code.

    Note: If two columns of the same set have the same score then omit the third column with the lowest value, and redo the columns of equal scores as before. Take the highest score of these two columns.

    Table 5 : Spiritual Mental Natural Thinking Feeling Acting

    Altruism Analytical Emotional Skeptical Idealistic Impulsive

    Authentic Factual Temperament Critical Pleasing Epicurean

    Benevolent Cultured Solipsistic Autonomy Dependent Immediate

    Serene Conversing Calculating Perceptive Indulgent Practical

    Compliant Intuitive Judgmental Attentive Engaging Monotonous

    Wisdom Objective Subjective Evaluative Sensitive Pragmatic

    Self-less Self-aware Selfish Serious Selective Spontaneous

    Punctilious Disciplined Scripted Competitive Cautious Tactless

    Unworldly Mystical Worldly Ambitious Contrite Naive

    Sincere Serious Self-centered Stuffy Stickler Spirited

    Intuitive Reflective Reflexive Alert Indecisive Excitable

    Empathy Sympathy Reciprocal Ethical Moralistic Indifferent

    Reliable Self-respect Confused Systematic Subdued Flamboyant

    Authoritative Authoritarian Permissive Assertive Aggressive Compliant

    Realistic Pessimistic Optimistic Proactive Reactive Active

    Creative Nosy Laid-back Productive Laborious Easy-going

    Serene Conceited Solipsistic Tactful Sadistic Unpretentious

    Dominant Domineering Liberal Leader Control Nurturing

    Conservative Activist Stoic Manager Strong-will Ministering

    Cultured Formal Informal Didactic Risky Simple

    Deliberate Inflexible Inconsistent Impressive Intolerant Sociable

    Calm Insecure Indifferent Expressive Introvert Extrovert

    Poise Withdrawn Careless Positive Erratic Gregarious

    Deep Circular Open Broad Narrow Straight

    Helpful Suspicious Pollyanna Cautious Gritty Witty

    Virtuous Smug Lenient Relaxed Uptight Casual

    Visionary Occult Addiction Materialism Rationalism Idealism

    A R P V G C

    Personality Code



    S M N T F AFor example suppose an adult gets NBPG. NB is infantile/sensory, PG is infantile, hedonistic. NBPG is an immature adult given to sensual/sensory gratifications. Individual Inclination Check List - II:

    Check one preferred item in each column. Use the table below to enter the letter before the row of maximum score . In a tie, reject the lowest score and the Music column.

    Table 6

    Music Sports Boss Minster Authority School Family Culture

    Section 1

    S. Gospel Family Respect Active Respect Desire Love Loyalty

    M. Classic Leisure Assent Neutral Accept Want Duty Proud

    N. Rock Keen Endure Cold Endure Need Chores Active

    Section 2

    T. Jazz Relaxes Oblige Passive Honor Vital Order Adds

    F. C’ntry Enjoy Please Fervent Fear Nice Open Enjoys

    B. Pop Excite Conform Help Agree Mini Play Labors

    Section 3

    A. Apt Patron Accept Proactive Support Maxi Listen Sensible

    R. N/One Fixated Dislike Reactive Hostile Crave Hate Distrust

    P. All Wild Submit Inactive Happy Apathy Liberal PraiseSection 4

    C. Any Fan Comply Regular Obey Satisfy Fun Accepts

    V. Opt Compete Reason Often Protest Compete Inspire Careful

    G. Rap Boring Argue Dislike Rebel Hate Tough CynicalPERSONALITY CODE


    A teen-age STAC may be mature, altruistic, authoritative, compliant and work by rule. Quantification of Personality Styles

    A numerical value may be arrived at for each configuration in the table by arbitrarily assigning values ranging from 1 to 4 to each type in the four categories. Virtues multiply, values add. So, the state values vary from 1 to 4 in a geometric progression and the status values vary from 1 to 3, in an arithmetic progression as in Table 7. Table 7

    Super-self Self Sovereign Servant

    Spiritual(S) = 4 Thinking(T) = 4 Authoritative(A) = 3 Compliant(C) = 3

    Mental(M) = 2 Feeling(F) = 2 Authoritarian (R) = 2 Assertive (V) = 2

    Natural(N) = 1 Behaving(B) = 1 Permissive(P) = 1 Aggressive(G) = 1

    The physical/natural (N) state gets the lowest value 1 and the Spiritual gets the maximum 4, the behavioral (acting) has a value of 1 and thinking gets 4. Authoritative Sovereign gets 3 and permissiveness gets 1. Since compliance is expected of a servant, it gets 3 while aggressiveness gets a value of 1. Thus, States N and B = 1; M, and F=2; S and T = 4. Status P and G =1; R and V=2; A and C=3.

    Thus N, B, P, G =1 M, F, R, V = 2 S, T =4 A, C =3. These numbers multiply to give a value for each of the 81 types, some values being the same. Sorting out these numbers give 17 different groups. The numbers in parenthesis refer to the total number of types in each group. These values are shown below each type in Table 8.

    These numbers by themselves do not quantitate personality, but they indicate trends. The ratio between the state and status values, ranging from 1 (NB/PG) to 16 (ST/PG) may be a better quantitative indicator of personality type. ST/PV = ST/RG = MT/PG = SF/PG=8. Two spiritual-thinking persons may be similar in traits if one is permissive and assertive and the other aggressive and authoritarian. Both will be similar to a permissive and aggressive person who is at the same time either mental-thinking or spiritual-feeling. There are other similar trait confugurations.

    The configuration NBPG=1 (1) may be a basic configuration that stand alone. It is natural, sensory-motor predispositions (NB) that drives a permissive *sovereign* and a compliant *servant*, covering the early infant days.. NBAC=9 (1) is its opposite in late adulthood, authoritative and compliant. STRV = 64 (1) and STAC = 144 (1) also seem to be unique. The numbers in parenthesis refer to the frequency of occurrence of that configuration. A similar arrangement is possible by assigning zero values to sovereign permissiveness (P) and servant aggressiveness (G). Sorting according to numerical values, yield sixteen groups as in Myers-Briggs and Kersey’s types

    Individual Inclination Check List I:In each set of three in Table 5, check the word that seems most befitting you, even if all the three may appeal to you or none of them will be particularly preferable. Answer as fast as possible across the table. First impression is the best indicator. Count the checks in each column and circle the alphabet at the bottom of the column with the highest score. Write the four alphabets below. This is your personality code.Table 5 : Spiritual Mental Natural Thinking Feeling Acting

    S M N T F A Altruism Analytical Emotional Skeptical Idealistic Impulsive

    Authentic Factual Temperament Critical Pleasing Epicurean

    Benevolent Cultured Solipsistic Autonomy Dependent Immediate

    Serene Conversing Calculating Perceptive Indulgent Practical

    Compliant Intuitive Judgmental Attentive Engaging Monotonous

    Wisdom Objective Subjective Evaluative Sensitive Pragmatic

    Self-less Self-aware Selfish Serious Selective Spontaneous

    Punctilious Disciplined Scripted Competitive Cautious Tactless

    Unworldly Mystical Worldly Ambitious Contrite Naive

    Sincere Serious Self-centered Stuffy Stickler Spirited

    Intuitive Reflective Reflexive Alert Indecisive Excitable

    Empathy Sympathy Reciprocal Ethical Moralistic Indifferent

    Reliable Self-respect Confused Systematic Subdued Flamboyant

    Authoritative Authoritarian Permissive Assertive Aggressive Compliant

    A R P V G C Realistic Pessimistic Optimistic Proactive Reactive Active

    Creative Nosy Laid-back Productive Laborious Easy-going

    Serene Conceited Solipsistic Tactful Sadistic Unpretentious

    Dominant Domineering Liberal Leader Control Nurturing

    Conservative Activist Stoic Manager Strong-will Ministering

    Cultured Formal Informal Didactic Risky Simple

    Deliberate Inflexible Inconsistent Impressive Intolerant Sociable

    Calm Insecure Indifferent Expressive Introvert Extrovert

    Poise Withdrawn Careless Positive Erratic Gregarious

    Deep Circular Open Broad Narrow Straight

    Helpful Suspicious Pollyanna Cautious Gritty Witty

    Virtuous Smug Lenient Relaxed Uptight Casual

    Visionary Occult Addiction Materialism Rationalism Idealism Personality Code: NBPG

    For example suppose an adult gets NBPG. NB is infantile/sensory, PG is infantile, hedonistic. NBPG is an immature adult given to sensual/sensory gratifications. Individual Inclination Check List - II:

    Check one preferred item in each column of Table 6. In the Personality Code below, enter the letter before the row of maximum score .

    Table 6. Music Sports Boss Church Authority School Family Social

    Section 1

    S. Gospel Exercise Respect Active Respect Desire Love Loyalty

    M. Classic Pleasure Assent Neutral Accept Want Duty Proud

    N. Rock Compete Endure Cold Endure Need Chores Active

    Section 2

    T. Jazz Relaxes Oblige Passive Honor Vital Order Adds

    F. C’ntry Enjoy Please Fervent Fear Nice Open Enjoys

    B. Pop Excite Conform Help Agree Mini Play Labors

    Section 3

    A. Apt Patron Accept Proactive Support Maxi Listen Sensible

    R. N/One Fixated Dislike Reactive Hostile Crave Hate Distrust

    P. All Wild Submit Inactive Happy Apathy Liberal Praise

    Section 4

    C. Any Fan Comply Regular Obey Satisfy Fun Accepts

    V. Opt Compete Reason Often Protest Compete Inspire Careful

    G. Rap Boring Argue Dislike Rebel Hate Tough Cynical

    Personality Code


    STAC

    A teen-age STAC may be mature, altruistic, authoritative, compliant and work by rule.

    TABLE 2 PERIODIC TABLE OF PERSONALITIES BASE NOBLE

    IA IIA IIIA IIIB IVB VB VIB VIIB VIIIB IB IIB IVA VA VIA VIIA VIIIA

    NB NF NT MB MF MT SB SB SF ST NB NF MB MF MT SF ST

    1. PG PG PG PG PG PG PG PG PG

    2. PV PV PV PV PV PV PV PV PV 3. PC PC PC PC PC PC PC PC PC 4. RV RV RV RV RV RV RV RV RV5.RGRGRG RCRCRCRCRG RC RC RG RG RG RG RG 6. AG AG AG AG AG AG AG AG AG7. AV AV AV AV AV AV AV AV AV 8. AC AC AC AC RC RC RC AC AC AC AC AC

    Table 3 Status Functions of Personality

    Periods and Stages: Characteristics Erickson

    REFERENCES:

    Coan, R. W., (1994). Personality types. In Corsini, R. J., (Ed.), Encyclopedia of

    Psychology. 2nd ed., Vol. 3 (pp. 58-60). New York: Wiley.

    Erickson, E.H., (1963). Childhood and Society (2nd ed.). New York, Norton [9,10] Erickson, E.H., (1968). Identity: Youth & Crisis, New York, Norton [10]

    Erickson, E.H., (1980). Identity & the Life Cycle, New York, Norton [10]; Erickson, E.H., Erickson, J.M., and Kivnick, H.Q. (1986). Vital Involvement in Old Age: The

    Experience of Old Age in Our Time, New York, Norton [10].

    Keirsey, David. (1995). Portraits of Temperament. 3rd. ed. Del Mar, CA: Prometheus

    Nemesis. pp. 6,12;

    Keirsey, David and Bates, Marilyn. (1978). Please Understand Me: Character and

    Temperament Types. Del Mar, CA: Prometheus Nemesis, pp. 3-4, 29-30.

    Keirsey, David. (1998) Please Understand Me II. CA: Prometheus Nemesis, p. 26.

    Millon, T. & Davis, R., (1996). Disorders of Personality: DSM-IV and Beyond. 2nd ed.

    New York: Wiley.

    Myers, I. B., & MCCauley, M.H. (1985). A guide to the development and use of the

    Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

    Oldham, J. M. & Morris L. B., (1991). The Personality Self-Portrait: Why You Think,

    Work, Love, and Act the Way You Do. New York: Bantam.

    Schwartz, M. A., Wiggins, O. P. & Norko, M. A., (1995). Prototypes, ideal types, and

    personality disorders: the return to classical phenomenology. In Livesley, W. John,

    (Ed.), The DSM-IV Personality Disorders, 1994. New York: Guilford
     
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