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PF Profesionals and Students.

  1. Jun 10, 2006 #1

    Pyrrhus

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    What specific careers (Experimental Physicist, Mechanical Engineer,...) the members of PF have/going to have?

    I am a student of Civil Engineering.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 10, 2006 #2

    Danger

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    None for me, buddy. Never finished high-school. :redface:
     
  4. Jun 10, 2006 #3
    My goals (academic):

    BS:
    Mechanical Engineering

    MS:
    Mechanical Engineering
    Electrical Engineering
    Systems Engineering
    (Maybe Applied Mathematics or Computer Science)

    In terms of work:
    Not too sure but there are a few areas of interest so far:

    Tomahawk Cruise Missile (guidance and controls)
    UAV's (Autopilot Design, Kalmann Filtering for vehicle identification and tracking [multiple hypothesis testing] also known as Ground Fusion Tracking)

    But who knows, something else may come along that is more interesting.

    PhD, eeeeh, maybe......
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2006
  5. Jun 10, 2006 #4
    Currently working on a BS in Pure Math (just recently switched from Secondary Math Education) which I should easily finish in 2 years. Overall goal is either Masters or PhD in Math, and then to teach Math (preferably at a community college).
     
  6. Jun 10, 2006 #5
    Wow, a guy like you Cyrus (with such a mountain of degrees) should try out for NASA or DARPA.
    I'm not in college yet, but I'll try out either for electrical engineering or any type of it, Particle physics, and maybe we'll see.
     
  7. Jun 10, 2006 #6
    Amazing, I was thinking about posting the same thread today. This is really uncanny.

    Anyway, right now I'm taking a BSc. Specialization in Actuarial Mathematics.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2006
  8. Jun 10, 2006 #7
    well, i got accepted to ucla as a math major, but i plan to swtich to a more practical major onces i got in. I have nothing in my mind but girls, and money. i might want to open up a solfware company with people infinitly more intelligent than i am. I don t like school at all, much less want to get a mountain of degrees like some other people.
     
  9. Jun 10, 2006 #8
    I'm working on getting into the medical laboratory science program and then hopefully going on the grad school from there.
     
  10. Jun 10, 2006 #9
    With this attitude, school is going to school you, hard. :rolleyes:
     
  11. Jun 11, 2006 #10
    +1

    I'd definitely change that attitude and fast, I've known a few people who were extremely smart in high school but with a similar attitude as you and once they got into univeristy they got put in their place fast. Needless to say a few of them won't be returning for second year and not by choice.
     
  12. Jun 11, 2006 #11
    If you don't like school, then why are you going to university?
     
  13. Jun 11, 2006 #12

    Danger

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    I second that, Toxic. Bloody hell... I'll take his spot if he doesn't want it. I'd kill for a decent education.
     
  14. Jun 11, 2006 #13

    loseyourname

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    You haven't looked at the curriculum for a business major lately, have you?
     
  15. Jun 11, 2006 #14
    I'm going to university next year as a general math student. After my first year, hopefully I'll know if i like math or physics better and get a degree in that.
     
  16. Jun 11, 2006 #15

    Math Is Hard

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    Just as a side note...
    You can't change to a business major after admission to a different major at UCLA, as far as I know. You have to be admitted from the beginning.
    http://www.admissions.ucla.edu/Prospect/Adm_tr/lsmajors/peco-bus.htm
    The same is true for psychology. They are very picky about this.
     
  17. Jun 11, 2006 #16
    Well, I have just finished 12th and am looking for a BTech in Computer Science at some good engineering college .
    After that, I will probably take a BSc in physics, for love of the subject.
     
  18. Jun 11, 2006 #17
    I'm currently a civil engineering student at Universtiy of Colorado. I'm really interested in structural engineering and hopefully would like to do something in that field. The program requires 136 credits to graduate, that seems like a lot. But I guess that's good in the long run. The more classes the more education. How many credits do you guys need?
     
  19. Jun 11, 2006 #18
    I'm a high school student right now, and hope to take something like engineering physics at McMaster, or engineering science at U of Toronto.

    I'd be going this fall, but our awesome high school screwed me out of a required math course :mad: . So I'll be sticking around for one credit, and working as a sattelite dish installer/ computer technician (and hopefully getting an A+ certification!).
     
  20. Jun 11, 2006 #19
    I need 90 credits to get a BSc., from which 60 are for my program and 30 are electives.
     
  21. Jun 11, 2006 #20
    90cr? Where do yo live ToxicBug, and what exactly is a BSc.? At my univeristy the minimum for any B.S. is 128cr.
     
  22. Jun 11, 2006 #21

    brewnog

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    BSc is a Bachelor of Science (as BA is Bachelor of Arts, MSc Master of Science, BEng Bachelor of Engineering....)
     
  23. Jun 11, 2006 #22
    Montreal, I'm going to Concordia University. Here our high school lasts till grade 11, then there's 2 year "college", so the university is only 3 years after that, not 4. I've done 3 physics classes + 1 optionnal, 2 chem classes, 1 bio, Cal1/Cal2 (single variable) and aslo optionnal Cal3 (multivariable), and also Linear Algebra I + Linear II (optionnal) in "college", however I have to take multivariable calculus and classes similar to Linear II in university.
     
  24. Jun 12, 2006 #23
    Credits work differently at different places. Here (Carleton University, Ottawa), honours programs are mostly 20 credits - you get .5 credits per semester-long course, so an honours degree works out to 40 four-month courses.
     
  25. Jun 12, 2006 #24

    Not at all. I love to learn, but the way schools teachs their subject makes me crane. each subject are never covered in any depth. There is a constant pressure to perform; such pressure are to me unproductive to learning. The spirit of inquary are not taught, and learning becomes equate to memorizations to pass a god damn exam. There is never any hint whatsoever that a single subjects is changing, or evolving. It is no surprise to me that students are failing at schools. if you people can look beyond a school s name, or merely classification of a particular subject( what degrees one got). learning is more than how much one knows, or what schools you go to, but rather many ways to see a single world. A place to share ideas. I think most schools fail the students in that regard. Most people i know who are good in a particular subject tend to be self-motivated( family values), or that they are born in a tradition that promotes academic. It is simply not representative of the 99 % of the population. You people here have grant ideas about universities, and learning, but you miss every thing a school is suppost to stand for: producing people to go out into the real world, and change it for the better. Improve the world.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2006
  26. Jun 12, 2006 #25
    Sorry for any misunderstanding, it just seemed from previous posts that you were more interested in things like girls and money that school.
     
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