Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Ph.D Philosophy

  1. Jun 11, 2005 #1

    cronxeh

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Ahh that title should get your attention!

    Ive been reading this guy's blog online. He is a postdoc in Physics and his views on education, knowledge, and attitudes towards certain things are right on the money - I think

    http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=7148544&blogID=28082368

     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 11, 2005 #2

    Gokul43201

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    If this person really does something great, I'd be surprised.
     
  4. Jun 11, 2005 #3
    I have to say I am more sleepier when I read your thread...
     
  5. Jun 12, 2005 #4

    PerennialII

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    .... he's right on the money in a sense that a large proportion of researchers do just work in the "pipeline", and for them physics is just straigtforward "work" without the elements of discovery and learning. Which is sad to say the least.
     
  6. Jun 12, 2005 #5
    I was disappointed, I was expecting to see more on his views on education in physics and in general. This article is just a rant and it makes him look like he regrets choosing to do what he does.
     
  7. Jun 12, 2005 #6
    That's a depressing way to look at things from a seemingly uninspired postdoctorate.

    Success is waking up every morning and wanting to go to work. If what you do is what you love to do, what inspires you and keeps you looking forward to the next day, then that's all that matters, even if it is just "straightforward work."
     
  8. Jun 12, 2005 #7

    cronxeh

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I dont think its his subject that is in question here - but rather the society that doesnt really find much interest in Physics, Math, and Engineering in general. I do believe he has a sincere affection for his subject, but the environment is not exactly favorable to an undergrad in sciences these days. Considering that financial planners get offers of 50-70k a year for start compared to a science undergrad (around 30-35k) and engineer (45-50k), I dont think the society has the right priorities and hence lays the problem of a neglected pipeline and general lack of funds for really cool ideas
     
  9. Jun 12, 2005 #8

    Gokul43201

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    This is just rot. What's the matter with this guy ?
     
  10. Jun 12, 2005 #9
    That's one kind of success which is only accessible to a small minority of the population, even in rich Western countries. The first problem is that not every thing that people want to do has a job associated with it (e.g. a professional sitting-on-the-beach-every-day-reading-philosophy-and-science person). The second problem is that even if a thing that people want to do does have a job associated with it, the chances of getting that job are slim due to heavy competition and/or not many of those jobs being available and/or the prerequisites (intellectual, physical or otherwise) being extremely high (e.g. a professional baseballer). The third problem is that even if you do land the job associated with want you really want to do, in practice you do a lot of other things in that job that you don't really like (perhaps even hate) doing (e.g. a scientist who spends only a small portion of his time doing research because most of the time he's teaching, applying for funding, doing admin work, etc).

    But there are other kinds of successes. For example, you can minimise the number of days that you have to go to work (and thus maximise the number of days off when you can pursue whatever interest you like) without putting yourself in financial straits. I currently have mine down to four, and I'm aiming for three. Some people can do two. I know one person who works six months and then takes six months off, year in, year out. I consider such people very successful. Unfortunately, the pressure

    But what you are saying and what I am saying in this thread supports the notion that free time (i.e. time spent doing what you want to do) is probably the most important thing in life.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Ph.D Philosophy
  1. A Bit of Philosophy (Replies: 1)

  2. Philosophy Discussion (Replies: 1)

  3. What is philosophy? (Replies: 4)

Loading...