Phase rule

  • Thread starter monty37
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Main Question or Discussion Point

can degree of freedom and phase rule be applied to organic reactions,is it
possible to degree of freedom above 3?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Mapes
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Yes and yes; the governing equation is P + F = C + 2, with no restrictions on organic components or the value of F.
 
  • #3
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can you give me examples of reactions having degree of freedom>3?
why don't we use the reduced phase rule equation i.e F=C-P+1 in organic reactions?
 
  • #4
Mapes
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can you give me examples of reactions having degree of freedom>3?
If you mixed four materials together, for example, (C = 4) there could be more than three degrees of freedom.

why don't we use the reduced phase rule equation i.e F=C-P+1 in organic reactions?
This would be appropriate if you assumed constant pressure; the 2 in the more general phase rule represents the two degrees of freedom contributed by allowing temperature and pressure to vary.
 

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