PhD project on BSM

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  • Thread starter Ramtin123
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  • #26
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But maybe at least a pointer in some broad direction?"
This is exactly my point.

But I did it by working my way from small to large, not from starting at the large from the beginning."
I like this phrase very much.
 
  • #27
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Tbh, I too am surprised by this remark. A student beginning a PhD is, by definition, not "mature as an independent researcher".

Your 2nd sentence is probably true only after one completes a PhD (though it can sometimes take longer).

If a beginning PhD student is not allowed to ask others for advice about topics, then wtf is the supervisor for? :oldconfused:
100% agree :)
 
  • #28
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massive_gravity

It´s an interesting topic, since it has interaction with high energy physics, cosmology (both theoretical and observational) and potentially also with beyond the standard model physics.

Hope you find it useful. :D
Very interesting theory...
 
  • #29
As the masses of Fermions cannot be predicted with in standard model, you might find Fermions mass problem in particular neutrino mass generation mechanism, as neutrino can be thought of as dark matter candidate and also has important role in inflation etc. It might also help you to work in cosmology later on.......
 
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  • #31
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As the masses of Fermions cannot be predicted with in standard model, you might find Fermions mass problem in particular neutrino mass generation mechanism, as neutrino can be thought of as dark matter candidate and also has important role in inflation etc. It might also help you to work in cosmology later on.......
Thanks Abdul Aziz, Fermion masses problem seems really interesting. I also went through your nice PhD thesis about this problem in GUT’s. But I’m not sure about your idea of connecting Neutrino masses to cosmology brother… Do you mean one can find a cosmological mechanism during inflation or due to DM, to determine neutrino mass?
 
  • #32
kdv
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I have a question about the paper that haushofer mentioned. In the paper, the author states that

Moving on to helicity 2, the required gauge symmetry is linearized general coordinate invariance. Asking for consistent self interactions leads essentially uniquely to GR and full general coordinate invariance .

I am not sure what this means. If we quantize GR, I know of course that we end up with a massless spin 2 graviton. Here, we treat the metric as a quantum field so it is clear that general covariance leads to a gauge symmetry in the quantum theory we obtain. But let's say with start with quantizing a spin 2 classical field in a flat spacetime. We may have a gauge symmetry which priori has nothing to do with spacetime coordinate transformation and general covariance. Is the author saying that consistency of a massless spin 2 theory automatically leads to a condition on the spacetime it evolves through? Even if initially the spin 2 particle has nothing to do with a metric? Or am I completely missing the point?
Thanks in advance.
 

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