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Philosophical SAT Arsenal

  1. Sep 10, 2004 #1

    Sak

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    Hello. I am a n00b who stumbled across this forum looking for physics help.

    Now I have a question for the philosophy buffs:

    As you may know, the new SAT I and the SAT II Writing both have an essay portion. There is a general statement with which you agree or disagree. Most of the statements are things like "Ignorance is Bliss" or "To learn is to teach". The best strategy, when combating these essays, is to use a personal example, a historical example, and an example in literature/philosophy.

    What are some good books to add to my arsenal?


    I already have read Protagoras, Symposium, Gorgias, Phaedro, Discourse on the Origins of Inequality, Tao te Ching, Candide, and Beyond Good and Evil. I have also read some books which are not philosophical works but help in variety of ways, such as Lord of the Flies (helps with group vs. individual, fundament of human character), Brave New World (technology vs. humanity, enjoying the simpiler things), Moby Dick (I don't know how this will help, but my SAT tutor thinks it will), and many others. On my to read list is the Social Contract, Civilization and its Discontents, Nausea, and the Gay Science.

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 10, 2004 #2

    chroot

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    I don't believe the reviewers are supposed to rate the content: what you actually say, or how eloquently you say it. They are mostly looking for spelling and grammar errors.

    - Warren
     
  4. Sep 10, 2004 #3

    Sak

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    I don't mean to be arguementative, but that's absolutely not true, at least for the SAT I. They are looking at your arguement and how well you argue it on a scale of 1 to 6. Then the scores are combined with another person who grades on the exact same scale looking for the exact same stuff. Trust me, we've looked into it, and seen actually essays and their actual scores. I saw an essay, that would get a C grade in spelling, grammar, and concision, yet had a coherent arguement and still scored a six.

    You just have to trust me on this one :smile:
     
  5. Sep 11, 2004 #4

    chroot

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    Okay, you're right, Sak. It's been a long time since I took the SAT, and it didn't involve any writing assignments back then.

    - Warren
     
  6. Sep 11, 2004 #5

    Gokul43201

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    Try Rand for Individualism, Sartre or Camus for Existentialism, and William James for Pragmatism.
     
  7. Sep 11, 2004 #6

    Sak

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    Thanks for reminding me! I'm actually reading Nausea by Sartre right now! I'm sorry I forgot to say it.
     
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