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Photon energy of black-body

  1. Aug 13, 2012 #1
    I have calculate that the mean approximate photon energy of a black-body spectrum which is emitted by an object at a temperature of 1 million K is 300eV. Can somebody confirm me that? My second doubt is: the wavelength at which this spectrum reaches a peak corresponds to a "longer" or to a "shorter" wavelength than that of the black-body spectrum emitted by the sun?
    Many thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 13, 2012 #2

    Drakkith

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    What do your calculations show for the Sun?
     
  4. Aug 14, 2012 #3
    I did not do any calculation about the sun but think that the spectrum of solar radiation is close to that of a black body with a temperature of circa 5,800 K and so the mean approximate photon energy is 1.74eV. If that so, are the wavelength at which this spectrum of the object at at a temperature of 1 million K that reaches a peak corresponds to a much shorter wavelength than that of the black-body spectrum emitted by the sun?
     
  5. Aug 14, 2012 #4

    mfb

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    300eV-photons have a shorter wavelength than 1.74eV-photons.
    The numbers are in a region where I would expect them, but I did not calculate them.
     
  6. Aug 14, 2012 #5

    Drakkith

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    Yes, the peak is a much shorter wavelength than the Sun emits. Do you know much about EM radiation and black body radiation?
     
  7. Aug 14, 2012 #6
    Thanks. yes, now I have all the info I needed.
     
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