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Phtoelectric effect

  1. Aug 25, 2004 #1
    Phtoelectric effect....

    As a result of the work function the photoelectron loses kinetic energy - but what is this energy converted into? People always say its the energy to overcome the electromagnetic forces but could someone please explain what this energy is actually converted into and how?

    Thanks. :)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 25, 2004 #2

    ZapperZ

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    It's the same effect when you shoot a ball vertically upwards. The ball loses kinetic energy - so what does that kinetic energy gets coverted to?

    The work function is nothing more than an attractive potential, the same way gravity is an attractive potential. If you don't have a problem with one, you shouldn't have a problem with the other.

    Zz.
     
  4. Aug 25, 2004 #3
    Light radiates into some electrode. Isn't this kinetic energy used to get some electron out of this electrode ???

    regards
    marlon
     
  5. Aug 25, 2004 #4

    ZapperZ

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    Huh?

    The question asked (if I interpret it correctly) from the point of the creation of photoelectrons AFTER absorption of photons. If a photoelectron has any kinectic energy, some of it will be "used up" to overcome the work function.

    Zz.
     
  6. Aug 26, 2004 #5

    Yeah, thanks ZapperZ, this is exactly what i intended to ask. The kinetic-energy is used up to some extent in order to overcome the work-function


    thanks
    regards
    marlon
     
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