Physics at University in UK

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  • #26
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It's my understanding that Sweden provides free tuition at undergraduate and masters level, but they are going to start charging for non EU/EEA student's PhD level study as from either 2010/11 or 2011/12 (can't remember which).

I'd love to get there to do a masters, but no scholarships for living costs unfortunately :(
its 2011/2012, you an international student come here for next semester (degrees are starting both autumn and spring) you don't have to pay anything. for that sake the tuition fee will probably be very low, since paying for education goes against soooooooooo many of our socialist thought around here

and as for covering living costs for you, depending on where you are from, the central student loan and benefit agency might be willing to cover it. check it up, the site is www.csn.se (think you can click on a flag or something to get it in English)

and the tutition fee will be for undergrad and master, for a PhD you usually can get paid to do if you do some teaching or something as well
 
  • #27
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I think the fees are pretty much the same wherever you choose to go, or at least I haven't found any differences. They might even be the same across England, but if not, they are only a couple hundred quid apart at most. Since you're from the EU, you'd be paying home fees, anyway, and I think they're in the range of £3,000 - 3,500. Be sure to check out their policies for second degree students, though. Manchester, for example, implemented one this year that states such students have to pay fees that international students' rates, which is a lot, and, in my opinion, not worth it, because you've got so many other universities on the same level without such policies. Though, of course, other universities could start doing the same thing, but I kind of doubt it, I think this is more of a "we're Manchester and we're aiming to be at the top with Oxbridge, so we can afford this kind of stuff" mentality :smile:

I'll let other people answer your second question, but, personally, I didn't even consider doing a BSc, but only an MPhys. From what I could tell, it's formally an undergraduate degree, but it "feels" and gives you the knowledge of a Masters one. But I'm not really sure how the implementation of the Bologna system impacted the UK, and I'm not studying there, so I can only guess. I've been told you can do a PhD after a MPhys, and possibly even after a BSc, though I guess not a lot of people get in then. And if you want to go abroad, I doubt they would take you in with only a BSc (except perhaps the US), as it's common practice in other countries to do a bachelors, Masters and doctorate without skipping the Masters. I come from an EU country, as well, and that's how it's done (t)here anyway (although, again, it's a bit weird now, since a bachelors degree usually took 4 years, but they had to trim it down to 3 years due to the Bologna process - now people that are getting Masters degrees are actually only on par with those that got a bachelors degree in the old system). And I've looked up some CV's from people that made it to MIT and such, and they had a Masters degree, too, even though they went to the US. Which, if you think about it, is kind of weird, because studying anywhere in the EU, a BSc will give you more Physics knowledge than a BSc in the US will. But eh, I digress. Still, I'd recommend doing a MPhys, it's only one additional year, but I bet the knowledge you get adds up to more than that and you're in a better position for a PhD (well, you're certainly not worse off than someone with a BSc).

Funding for EU students unfortunately isn't as good as for UK residents, because there's no bursary scheme that would take into account your finances. You can get a loan quite easily, but the amount you can get isn't that high (I think it's around £3,000 maximum, so if you don't have a lot of money, that's not going to help that much, it's not a make-or-break kind of amount). I have a friend who studied in West Bromwhich, though, and said she didn't spend much more than she would've at home (and I don't come from one of the affluent European countries, such as Germany or France). Though take that with a pinch of salt, she had that cheap British grocery store chain right across her apartment, and you know how it is with girls, they don't eat much :wink: Anyway, I stopped following the Euro-sterling exchange rate, but I think the UK is the most affordable English-speaking country to study in for an EU student right now. Unless you get a scholarship in the US, Canada or Australia, anyway.

But, again, I'm not studying in the UK, I'm in Canada right now, but this is the info I gathered this year when contemplating studying there.
What about part time jobs? Are they discouraged for full time students?
 
  • #28
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What about part time jobs? Are they discouraged for full time students?
Discouraged by whom?
 
  • #29
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Discouraged by whom?
Well, some countries in the EU restrict student work. What about the UK?
 
  • #30
cristo
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Well, some countries in the EU restrict student work. What about the UK?
If you're in the UK on a student visa then the number of hours per week you are allowed to work is restricted by the immigration services. Otherwise, as Ryker said, who would restrict you from working?
 
  • #31
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If you're in the UK on a student visa then the number of hours per week you are allowed to work is restricted by the immigration services.
Yeah, but since he's from the EU, I don't think he'd have any restrictions imposed upon him. I'm not completely sure those transitive periods are over for all countries, though, so there might still be a catch somewhere.
 
  • #32
cristo
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Yeah, but since he's from the EU, I don't think he'd have any restrictions imposed upon him.
If he is from the EU then he won't be here on a student visa.
 
  • #34
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Looks like it did materialize. Can anyone tell me if this affair will affect universities in Scotland? Edinburgh or St. Andrews for example.
 
  • #35
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If you want to really learn physics then you will spend most of your evenings studying and only a couple of evenings a week drinking in the union bar or some other activity.
That's not true. As a full time student you can spend all day studying - you can do something else every evening, and still *really* learn physics! That said, a couple of evenings a month is probably enough time to spend in the average union bar - try acting, dancing, chess, clubs, dating girls (!), Indian restaurants, russian restaurants, classical concerts, pop concerts... every night.. you get the idea.... There is no time in your life when you will be able to experience such a wide range of experiences. Get out there and enjoy! As long as you don't get too many hangovers you'll be all the fresher for your day "job" - studying physics - which should also be fun - if not do something else!
 
  • #36
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Looks like it did materialize. Can anyone tell me if this affair will affect universities in Scotland? Edinburgh or St. Andrews for example.
For said universities the cap has been raised to £9,000, i'm afraid. (Unless you're scottish)
 
  • #37
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For said universities the cap has been raised to £9,000, i'm afraid. (Unless you're scottish)
Well, now what?.. £36k of debt is a bit much for me. Perhaps it's not entirely off-topic, where else could I enroll in physics, regarding the fact that I know no other language except my native and English and I will be a bachelor in economics in a semester?
 

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