Physics at University

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  • Thread starter Vixus
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  • #1
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Hey there. First post, so tell me if I'm doing anything wrong.
I got called to Oxford for an interview recently and it all went horribly wrong. Of course, I didn't get an offer. I know this is not the be-all and end-all and I still want to study physics. However, I can't help but feel I don't have a clear aim with where I want to go with physics and maybe that came across in my interviews.

I enjoy studying Physics, although I only just really got into it. Namely the fields of cosmology and nuclear physics (quantum mechanics, elementary particles, applications, etc). I know Physics is mostly mathematical, so I'll need to buck up my maths skills. It's just the fact that Physics governs our universe, that's what gets me so hooked on it. I want to be able to study it further but I don't have any idea about careers or the future.

I only very recently decided on taking Physics instead of Biology for instance. My mind just switched. I think what I'd like to is design or create something at the end of the day. If it means researching at the forefront of the field, no matter.

It's my final year in school and I need to start making some important life decisions. Hope you can help out.
Thanks, Vix.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
chroot
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If you like designing and building things that make use of your understanding of the physical world, perhaps engineering is for you? You'll also have a much easier time landing a well-paying job, which is, unfortunately, a primary concern for most people.

- Warren
 
  • #3
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I actually did think about it, but don't know if I really want to go for engineering at university. I think I'm being more theoretical in what I want to study. An engineering job, maybe. I've seen physicists enter many different vocations such as investment banking (to name one.)

Is it possible to enter engineering after taking up physics at university?
 
  • #4
chroot
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It's rather easy to take up an engineering position after studying physics, but very difficult to accomplish the converse. You would need to learn some of the tools that engineers use, but most of the concepts will be already be familiar to you.

- Warren
 
  • #5
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Do you have any recommended reading material for nuclear physics, radioactivity, quantum theory?
 
  • #6
chroot
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Undergraduate QM and Nuc&Particle texts.

- Warren
 
  • #7
rho
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Did you actually get rejected from oxford or are you still waiting to hear from them?

Where else did you apply?
 
  • #8
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rho said:
Did you actually get rejected from oxford or are you still waiting to hear from them?

Where else did you apply?
Yeah, got rejected. I applied to UCL (conditional), Edinburgh (Unconditional), St Andrews, Imperial. I may apply to Oxford again next year (Year 2 entry.)
 
  • #9
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wow im in the same boat as u thats what i did i was thinking of applying to something biology related but changed my mind last minute because i knew i really loved physics but i was afraid i wouldn't be any good at it being a girl..dunno y.
 
  • #10
rho
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Vixus said:
Yeah, got rejected. I applied to UCL (conditional), Edinburgh (Unconditional), St Andrews, Imperial. I may apply to Oxford again next year (Year 2 entry.)

Well done on your other offers, i'm still waiting for Cambridge to reply (doubt I got in). Have you visited UCL, I'v got an interview next month and I wondered if the department was any good?
 
  • #11
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Turns out Imperial was unsuccessful as well. Just have to wait for St. Andrews now, I guess.
 

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