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Physics B problem check

  1. Aug 28, 2006 #1
    I have the Giancoli text and I ran accross this lvl III problem (pg 44 , #48) on the hmwk:

    Suppose you adjust your garden hose nozzle for a hard stream of water. You point the nozzile vertically upwatd at a height of 1.5 m above the graound. When you quickly move the nozzle away from the vertical, you hear the water striking the ground next to you for another 2.0 secs. What is the speed as it leaves the nozzle

    the drawing is something like this. The hose is the dash, the water is the x, the side dash is the length above the ground:

    then it comes curving down in a parabola, the hose is 1.5 m from the ground

    x
    x
    x
    [ ]
    [ ]
    [ ]
    [ ]
    |
    | > 1.5 m
    |

    - sorry for the bad illustration. I can't get it to work right

    - I got 4.2 m/s after a bunch of algebra, can someone tell me if thats right and work it out possibly?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 28, 2006 #2

    Andrew Mason

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    Why don't you explain how you got it? What is the height that the water reaches? How is that related to the speed of the water?

    AM
     
  4. Aug 28, 2006 #3
    lol...it was really complicated, but umm someone else got 9.05 m/s and they did it in like one line. Iono thought cuz it was one of the last problem on that page so i dont think it cant be solved in like 1 line
     
  5. Aug 28, 2006 #4

    Andrew Mason

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    So you were guessing? You get most of your marks for being able to explain the physics. the right answer is worth very little if you can't explain how you got it.

    What determines how long the water continues to hit the ground after the water stops going up? How does that related to the speed of the water?

    AM
     
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