Physics behind burning water

In summary: Summary:In summary, this researcher claimed that you can generate energy by burning hydrogen and oxygen that is produced by irradiating water with RF. However, this process has a limited energy efficiency and is currently the subject of crackpot speculation.
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I remember a paper where some mineral was added to water that was irradiated with some RF and as a result hydrogen was produced and could be set on fire.

What is the physics behind this?
 
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  • #2
Water is hydrogen and oxygen, so if you add enough energy (the usual way is by electrolysis), you can split the hydrogen and oxygen, then burn them.

The catch, of course, is that the amount of energy generated by burning the hydrogen and oxygen is precisely equal to the amount of energy used up to separate them.

This specific method has been discussed several times, and unfortunately is currently the subject of crackpot speculation. Make no mistake: you can't get more energy from this process than you put into it.
 
  • #3
I believe I recall the same article. It appeared to be a revamp of the old "crackpot speculation" to which Russ referred. What made it "news" at the time was that this researcher claimed it was the salt in the water that he was burning, and that this constituted eight "fuel" of sorts. This is separated his claim from the perpetual motion-type designs of his predecessors.

However, since I never heard anything more about it, I assumed that it was the same kind of nonsense as other "water burning" claims.
 
  • #4
Instead of a mineral, just add Sodium or Potassium, no RF needed.
 
  • #5
How can RF make water (hydrogen oxygen) ignite? And what is the energy efficiency of this process. Is there any published information regarding the Kanzius experiments?
 
  • #6
Jeff Reid said:
Instead of a mineral, just add Sodium or Potassium, no RF needed.

Yup... nothing unclogs a sewer line better than flushing half a kilo of sodium wrapped up in paper. :biggrin:
 
  • #7
Folks, the law of thermodynamics applies in ALL energy production.
I propose adding a cavity resonator containing a small microwave transmitter (say, a cordless or cell phone oscillator) and tuned crystal array) to en engine throttle body fuel injector. As the injector sprays mists of of saline, the cavity resonator will break down the valance bonds and the hydrogen will ignite. I bet the entire package could be mass produced for less than $100.
 
  • #8
Bob-45 said:
Folks, the law of thermodynamics applies in ALL energy production.
I propose adding a cavity resonator containing a small microwave transmitter (say, a cordless or cell phone oscillator) and tuned crystal array) to en engine throttle body fuel injector. As the injector sprays mists of of saline, the cavity resonator will break down the valance bonds and the hydrogen will ignite. I bet the entire package could be mass produced for less than $100.
Or the hydrogen simply recombines with the oxygen, so there is no benefit, and one still has to put more energy in than one gets out.
 
  • #9
I did a long post on this that includes links to patents. and a lot discussion. one of the things that came out in the discussion is that the the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Oxygen is 13.556.-- which is the frequency that Kanzius used.

[Link removed - Zz]
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #10
Not really sure why we allowed this discussion to continue...

Welcome to pf, chas, but pleas note, we don't do crackpot discussions here.
 

What is the physics behind burning water?

The physics behind burning water involves the process of combustion, which is a chemical reaction between water and a fuel source. When water is heated to its boiling point, it turns into steam and expands, causing it to rise. As the steam rises, it mixes with oxygen in the air, creating a highly flammable mixture. When a fuel source, such as a match, is introduced to this mixture, it ignites and produces a flame.

Why does water burn?

Water itself does not burn, but the steam produced from heated water is flammable. This is because steam is a mixture of water vapor and oxygen, both of which are necessary for combustion to occur. When the steam is ignited, the oxygen and fuel source combine to release heat and light, creating a flame.

Is burning water dangerous?

Burning water can be dangerous if proper precautions are not taken. The steam produced from burning water can be extremely hot and can cause burns. In addition, the flame produced can also cause fire hazards if not monitored carefully. It is important to handle the burning water with caution and to have a fire extinguisher nearby in case of emergencies.

What are the applications of burning water?

Burning water has several practical applications. In chemistry labs, burning water is often used to demonstrate the concept of combustion and fuel sources. In addition, burning water can also be used as a source of energy, as the heat produced from the flame can be harnessed to power engines and generators.

Can all types of water burn?

No, not all types of water can burn. Pure water, which is H2O, does not contain any impurities or fuel sources, so it cannot burn. However, water that contains dissolved gases or minerals can produce a flame when heated. This is because the dissolved gases or minerals act as a fuel source for the combustion reaction to occur.

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