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Physics degrees and marketability

  1. Apr 20, 2003 #1
    I am on schedule to graduate with a B.S. in Physics after Fall semester 2003. It will have taken 3 years and one semester from start to finish, and it dawned on me over spring break that I might supplement the physics with computer or electrical engineering. So I calculated it out and it will take 5 years and 1 semester to get the dual degree. If I don't get the dual, I want to go to get a master's degree in applied physics. Which will take 2 or 3 years in itself. I know I don't want a PhD because all of the sources I've looked up say it takes on average 5 to 6.5 years to earn. I don't want to be 29 before I can get a job, that really bothers me, so the PhD is out of the question for me really. So from all of you guys who have gotten degrees in physics or know others that have phys. degrees or know anyting about this kind of stuff how would you compare the marketability of something like physics plus computer engineering B.S.'s with physics and a some ( more that likely ) condensed matter centric applied physics master's degree? Would a master's degree in applied physics or some type of EE be great, good or so so if I had earned the dual degree in phys. and EE or computer engineering? Thanks for the input.

    -Grady
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 20, 2003 #2
    As a student of Computer Science & Engineering, I can say this will be great for you. As I found when we wanna design a graphical application, which is geometry related or Game Development which is very much physics dependent needs the depth knowledge of motion and many other math related things. So you can take a chance to work in that area..........
     
  4. Apr 21, 2003 #3

    GENIERE

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    I don't see a dual degree increasing your marketability. I would check out getting a masters in engineering. Computor engineeering was not available in my time, but would it not mean just a few more courses than when pursuing a masters in physics? It would improve your marketing for either career choice.

    Regards
     
  5. Apr 23, 2003 #4
    I don't know about the degree, but when it comes to marketability, the more you have to offer, the better.
    Plus, if there are any internships, volunteer positions, etc., you could do, that would also increase your chances of finding a job. But that advice applies to ANY degree...
     
  6. Apr 23, 2003 #5
    I don't know about the degree, but when it comes to marketability, the more you have to offer, the better.
    Plus, if there are any internships, volunteer positions, etc., you could do, that would also increase your chances of finding a job. But that advice applies to ANY degree...
     
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