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Programs Physics degrees in the world?

So I'm looking to do a bachelor's degree which involves a lot of physics and math but one that is not engineering, maybe like a BSc in physics? Idk
Anyone got any suggestions?
 

Dr. Courtney

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So I'm looking to do a bachelor's degree which involves a lot of physics and math but one that is not engineering, maybe like a BSc in physics? Idk
Anyone got any suggestions?
I'm not sure what your question is. What are your goals? What are your constraints? Where are you in your educational path? What is your real question here?
 

symbolipoint

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So I'm looking to do a bachelor's degree which involves a lot of physics and math but one that is not engineering, maybe like a BSc in physics? Idk
Anyone got any suggestions?
Goal seems too limited. Study if you want, for bachelor of science degree in Physics. Then what do you want to be able to do? Without Engineering, Physics becomes too limited. Maybe include several courses from one or more other sciences. After graduating later, what employment position will you want?
 
@Dr. Courtney
Right
So if really like to be a lecturer in the future and I know id need a master's and all that.
I've just finished high school, finished a levels, I did the edexcel curriculum, and took the science stream.
My constraints are that I wouldn't want to do engineering as most of it involves field work which I'm not very comfortable with. But I do know that if I'm looking to go further in physics, engineering degrees are a popular and world renowned option.
Also looking for a degree that would be eligible for a scholarship cuz I've done good in my A levels and there's no point of that if I don't get a scholarship.
Hence, I'm looking for a suitable degree, that would at the same time be useful in the future, doesn't involve field work, would help me become a lecturer and involves physics and math but what isn't engineering. Can u help?
 
Goal seems too limited. Study if you want, for bachelor of science degree in Physics. Then what do you want to be able to do? Without Engineering, Physics becomes too limited. Maybe include several courses from one or more other sciences. After graduating later, what employment position will you want?
Goal seems too limited. Study if you want, for bachelor of science degree in Physics. Then what do you want to be able to do? Without Engineering, Physics becomes too limited. Maybe include several courses from one or more other sciences. After graduating later, what employment position will you want?
I'd want to be a lecturer.
The thing is I find physics very interesting and I just want to go deeper than what they teach us during A levels etc. And I want to be able to give back later in a similar way.
 
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As a high school student, how do you know you wouldn't enjoy "field work"? Seems like you are restricting yourself based on experience you don't have.
 
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I wouldn't want to do engineering as most of it involves field work
Sounds like you may have a misconception here. Are you saying that you don't want to get your hands dirty? If so, that's OK, and does not preclude engineering. I am an engineer, and I have not done anything hands-on in many years (I'm too old and shaky now to do it!). What you see as "field work" might better be thought of as "real, visible, down-to-earth things." A whole lot of engineering involves mathematical models, computer simulations, and applications of physics principles. I will say, however, that most engineers are very pleased when they get to see the functioning physical results of their work.
 

CrysPhys

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So I'm looking to do a bachelor's degree which involves a lot of physics and math but one that is not engineering, maybe like a BSc in physics? Idk
Anyone got any suggestions?
What country are you in? Do schools in your country make a distinction between a bachelor's degree in physics granted by a school of arts and sciences vs a school of engineering? Are you planning to stop with a bachelor's, or would you consider a graduate degree (masters or PhD)?
 
What country are you in? Do schools in your country make a distinction between a bachelor's degree in physics granted by a school of arts and sciences vs a school of engineering? Are you planning to stop with a bachelor's, or would you consider a graduate degree (masters
or PhD)?
I'm in Sri Lanka. And Idk whether they make a distinction or not. What diff does that make really?
No I would absolutely consider a masters/phD
 
Sounds like you may have a misconception here. Are you saying that you don't want to get your hands dirty? If so, that's OK, and does not preclude engineering. I am an engineer, and I have not done anything hands-on in many years (I'm too old and shaky now to do
it!). What you see as "field work" might better be thought of as "real, visible, down-to-earth things."
A whole lot of engineering involves mathematical
models, computer simulations, and applications of physics principles. I will say, however, that most engineers are very pleased when they get to see the functioning physical results of their
work.
Oh, that's good to hear.
Well may I ask what field work actually involves?
And no its not becuz of me not wanting to get my hands dirty, I don't mind doing so actually.
 
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The term "field work" is pretty generic; it means a lot of different things depending on the context. Let me cite a few examples (not an exhaustive list at all):

1) For a construction engineer, field work might mean being out on the construction site, looking at problems on the spot and suggesting fixes;

2) For a machinery engineer, field work might mean taking vibration measurements on operating machinery in an industrial environment such as a power plant or a steel mill;

3) For a radio/TV engineer, field work might mean resolving an issue with an antenna;

4) For an electrical power engineer, field work might mean investigating breaker and/or transformer problems in a power plant or distribution center;

5) For a drilling engineer, field work might mean figuring out why a drill is not advancing and working out a solution;

6) For a controls engineer, field work might mean tuning a control system to the desired dynamic response on actual operating machinery.

Etc, etc. In one sense, "field work" is the opposite of "office work," meaning that it is usually done on the job site rather than in an office environment.
 

CrysPhys

Education Advisor
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I'm in Sri Lanka. And Idk whether they make a distinction or not. What diff does that make really?
No I would absolutely consider a masters/phD
I'm having a hard time understanding what your issue is. What I've gathered so far from your posts are the following:

(1) You are interested in physics and math
(2) You are not interested in engineering
(3) You are willing to go to grad school after completing your undergrad degree
(4) You would like to pursue a career as a lecturer

Is that correct? If so, I really don't understand why there is an issue with pursuing an undergrad degree in physics ... Unless I'm missing critical information; for example, if pursuing an undergrad degree in physics in your country requires you to take a lot of engineering courses that you don't want. You sound as if an undergrad degree in physics would force you into an unwanted career in engineering; and I don't understand why you feel that way. That's certainly not the case in the US. If there are additional constraints in your country, please clarify.
 
The term "field work" is pretty generic; it means a lot of different things depending on the context. Let me cite a few examples (not an exhaustive list at all):

1) For a construction engineer, field work might
mean being out on the construction site, looking at problems on the spot and suggesting fixes;

2) For a machinery engineer, field work might
mean taking vibration measurements on
operating machinery in an industrial environment such as a power plant or a steel mill;

3) For a radio/TV engineer, field work might
mean resolving an issue with an antenna;


4) For an electrical power engineer, field work might mean investigating breaker and/or
transformer problems in a power plant or
distribution center;

5) For a drilling engineer, field work might mean figuring out why a drill is not advancing and working out a solution;


6) For a controls engineer, field work might mean tuning a control system to the desired dynamic
response on actual operating machinery.


Etc, etc. In one sense, "field work" is the opposite of "office work," meaning that it is usually done
on the job site rather than in an office
environment.
Yeah that's the sort of picture I had of field work.
Thanks for the info, it does sound interesting for sure.
 
I'm having a hard time understanding what your issue is. What I've gathered so far from your posts are the following:

(1) You are interested in physics and math
(2) You are not interested in engineering
(3) You are willing to go to grad school after completing your undergrad degree
(4) You would like to pursue a career as a lecturer

Is that correct? If so, I really don't understand why there is an issue with pursuing an undergrad degree in physics ... Unless I'm missing critical information; for example, if pursuing an
undergrad degree in physics in your country
requires you to take a lot of engineering courses that you don't want. You sound as if an undergrad degree in physics would force you into an unwanted career in engineering; and I don't
understand why you feel that way. That's
certainly not the case in the US. If there are additional constraints in your country, please clarify.
Yes you are correct.
My issue is (I've just done some research and figured out the real prob here) that I want to pursue an undergrad degree that focuses on
physics. I just can't decide on a suitable physics major: physics/ applied physics/ mathematical physics/ theoretical physics.
In your opinion, since I don't mind math, which of these majors do you think will be the Most useful and would still exist in the future, and one that I can use to become a lecturer if I wanted to?
 
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I just can't decide on a suitable physics major: physics/ applied physics/ mathematical physics/ theoretical physics.
In the US at least, undergrad physics is not generally split up as you suggest. It is just "physics" -- covering classical mechanics, E&M, quantum, thermo/stat physics, fluid mechanics, and a few electives. Plus calculus, diff equations, linear algebra, complex analysis, special functions. This is the material anyone moving on to grad school in physics needs to know.
 

CrysPhys

Education Advisor
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Yes you are correct.
My issue is (I've just done some research and figured out the real prob here) that I want to pursue an undergrad degree that focuses on
physics. I just can't decide on a suitable physics major: physics/ applied physics/ mathematical physics/ theoretical physics.
In your opinion, since I don't mind math, which of these majors do you think will be the Most useful and would still exist in the future, and one that I can use to become a lecturer if I wanted to?
OK, now you have a clear question. In the US, for an undergrad degree in physics, typically the degree is just "physics". There are some schools that offer a degree in "applied physics" or "engineering physics". Since these are geared for someone interested in engineering, and you are not, they would not be the right choice for you. I am not aware of an undergrad degree in "mathematical physics" or "theoretical physics" in the US (but I have not done a search either). They are typically concentrations for graduate programs. Regardless, even if schools in your country offerred such degrees, I would not recommend them: you want a well-rounded program, and it's important that you be exposed to experimental work, even if you later decide to concentrate on theoretical or mathematical physics.

Now with respect to a career as a "lecturer", you will need to clarify what that means in your country, the requirements to become one, and the number of openings. In the US, that's not a common term. I believe in some countries it refers to an instructor or a professor that teaches courses, but does not lead a research group. Note that even though you have no interest in engineering work, you need to consider a backup career plan in the event that a career as a lecturer is hard to come by. Then you also want some courses, skills, and experience that is of value to other employers. That then depends on the flexibility for choosing elective courses offerred by the degree programs in your country.

Just to clarify: For your undergrad degree, are you planning to stay in Sri Lanka, or are you considering other countries as well? And, ideally, if you became a lecturer, would it be in your home country? Be aware that programs, requirements, and opportunities are country specific.
 
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