1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Physics Education Research

  1. Apr 9, 2014 #1
    Hello all!

    I'm a fourth year grade student in physics (specifically theoretical cosmology).

    Over the years I've become more and more interested in education. I even applied and was accepted as a STEM instructor for a local high school...which probably takes up more of my time than my adviser would like ;)

    I'm playing around with the idea of maybe getting into physics education research but I admittedly know little about this field.

    Do postdoc positions...or grants...or really anything exist for people who get a PhD and want to go into this field?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 9, 2014 #2
  4. Apr 9, 2014 #3
    After doing some research, I'm learning about PER. It's hard for me to find postdoc options for such groups. Do these not exist?
     
  5. Apr 9, 2014 #4
    I imagine that you are likely going to need a phd in physics education research if you want to do research in physics education similar to needing a phd in physics to do physics research.

    You could apply to a program like UC Boulders.
     
  6. Apr 10, 2014 #5

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

  7. Apr 10, 2014 #6
  8. Apr 10, 2014 #7

    Choppy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    In my experience, the people who get into physics education research are often lecturers who's primary duties are teaching and don't have other ongoing research projects. A number of community college instructors come to mind. That's NOT to say that they do it because they can't do something else. I think it's more that physics education questions naturally arise more frequently for those in teaching positions.

    Also, I suspect funding for larger education projects would be relatively small compared to other physics research projects. I'm under the impression a lot of physics education research is done by individuals or small group collaborations and those projects generally don't require a dedicated post-doctoral researcher. You might see a summer position for an undergrad student to help develop a new lab experiment now and then, but you won't see too many post-doctoral positions for physics education research.
     
  9. Apr 17, 2014 #8

    robphy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

  10. Sep 25, 2014 #9
    Anyone knows about PER opportunties in Los Angeles area ?
    I am even looking for volunteer opportunities
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook