1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Physics Engineering

  1. Mar 2, 2006 #1
    "Physics Engineering"

    If I get my BSc and some associated higher degree and go into the industry where I'm put into some R&D program, how will my job differ from that of an engineer? I understand that a physicist isn't ceritified like an engineer, but by how much would that limit me?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 3, 2006 #2

    Tom Mattson

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I have a degree in Engineering Physics, and these programs vary wildly from school to school. It will be tough to answer your question without some background info. Can you post a link to your school's Physics Engineering curriculum?
     
  4. Mar 3, 2006 #3
    Well, I am am double major in electrical engineering and engineeing physics. The engineering physics degree here is basically the same exact thing as the professional physics degree, except the engineering physics degree lacks the analytical mechanics requirement, and instead you take statics and dynamics. Also, in engineering physics, all of the free electives in the physics program are pretty much filled with engineering classes.
     
  5. Mar 3, 2006 #4

    Integral

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I work in the technology development section of a High Profile company. Several of the engineers I work with have PhDs in Physics. There may be companies who have positions entitled Physicist but I will bet you will find most positions are called engineers. Few if any of the engineers in the company I work for are Certified PEs.
     
  6. Mar 3, 2006 #5

    Tom Mattson

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    That (edit: "that" being leright's response) illustrates what I mean by wild variance from school to school. My degree program was basically the same as the Nuclear Engineering program. But while NE majors took a 2-semester sequence of reactor engineering and 1 semester of electronics for non-EE majors, we took a 2-semester sequence of quantum mechanics and 1 semester of circuit analysis for EE majors. We also had to take an upper level course in electrodynamics (Griffiths). We were encouraged to use our electives on more math and physics.

    So it's really not possible to answer the question in the OP without seeing the curriculum.
     
  7. Mar 3, 2006 #6
    Sorry, I meant to add that I'm taking just honours physics. I guess I wasn't clear.
     
  8. Mar 3, 2006 #7
    This is what I was getting at. Thanks!
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Physics Engineering
  1. Physics to Engineering (Replies: 2)

  2. Engineering Physics (Replies: 1)

Loading...