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Homework Help: Physics Equation

  1. Oct 12, 2004 #1
    Okay, I have this equation and I want to solve for v, so basicaly it's really just an algebra problem.

    Original equation
    20=(v)sin(35)*(159/v)+.5(-9.8)(159/v)^2

    v^2=(sin(35)(159)+.5(-9.8)(159^2))/20<-- what I do, then I take it to the ^(1/2)

    The answer should be 42, but I keep getting crazy answeres. What am I doing wrong?

    thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 12, 2004 #2

    Claude Bile

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    Science Advisor

    When you multiplied through by v^2, you forgot to multiply the 1st term on the RHS by v^2.

    Claude.
     
  4. Oct 12, 2004 #3
    Can anyone help me with this question?

    Use the Continuity Equation to explain how jet engines provide a forward thrust for an airplane.


    I don't think only the actual equation would help to explain fully the question but I really need some specific explaination for this.
     
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