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Physics jargon for short film

  1. Jun 26, 2005 #1
    This may be an odd post, but I'm writing a short film in which a college student is having some trouble with a general physics course.

    Having never taken physics myself, I'm looking for sample dialogue to use in a particular scene.

    What I need help with is the professor's dialogue in this scenario:
    After class, the student listens to her professor conclude his explanation of how to solve a particular physics problem, or maybe he explains a way of thinking that makes clear how to solve an entire host of problems. The student's response is something like "ahh, now that makes sense."

    It is mere days before finals week, so the professor's explanation must be about something beyond simple physics principles, but it cannot be more advanced than what is taught in an introductory physics course.

    Any and all suggestions would be of great help. Thanks!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 26, 2005 #2

    cronxeh

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    Think along these lines:


     
  4. Jun 27, 2005 #3

    Gokul43201

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    This isn't doing all too well in homework help. I'm moving it to GD...
     
  5. Jun 27, 2005 #4
    Ha! Interesting example, cronxeh.
    Much appreciated.
     
  6. Jun 27, 2005 #5

    Danger

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    How about checking with Greg and the participants about permission to copy part of a GP thread?
     
  7. Jun 27, 2005 #6

    Evo

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    I can't believe that on a physic's forum, no one has been able to come up with anything??
     
  8. Jun 27, 2005 #7
    How about finding the final velocity of a sphere (or perhaps a cylinder, or something that has an easy-to-calculate moment of inertia) rolling down an inclined plane? In order to do the problem, it would be easiest to use conservation of total energy. So the kinetic energy at the bottom of the inclined plane will be equal to the potential energy at the top of the inclined plane. However, the final kinetic energy will have two components: one due to translation, and the other due to rotation. I always thought this was a nifty little problem. Just throwing something out there, let me know if you want details
     
  9. Jun 27, 2005 #8

    Moonbear

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    Well, what sounds physic-y enough in a little clip that's supposed to be the end of a lecture? Most lectures just end with "I guess that's all the time we have today." :rofl:

    Actually, it's just a rather broad, open-ended type question.

    I guess you could simply end with something like, "...and that's how you derive the equation for..." and then fill in the name of any equation.

    Alternatively, you could do the "fluff" type deal where you don't actually include any physics and just fake it. You can show the professor at the chalkboard and keep the camera angle such that you hear the scratching of chalk on the chalkboard but can't actually see what's being written, and have him/her saying something like, "then you integrate here..." (scratch scratch scratch with the chalk) "and solve the resulting equation with your known variables..." (scratch scratch scratch) "and that's all we have time for today. Don't forget next week's quiz will include the material we covered in today's lecture."
     
  10. Jun 27, 2005 #9

    Evo

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    Or as one of my less memorable english professors usually ended "since most of you are asleep anyway". :tongue:
     
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