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Physics of soccer

  1. Aug 10, 2011 #1
    Hello,
    I'm doing an extended Essay for my IB diploma on the Physics of soccer. My research question is how does the air pressure affect the path of a curveball? i don't have a ball lanching machine... Any ideas for easy ways to make one. It just has to kick the ball!!Any advice or help would be very much appreciated
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 11, 2011 #2
    a simple pendulum
     
  4. Aug 11, 2011 #3

    ehild

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    Think, where can the air pressure come in. Does it change the density of air?

    What forces act on the ball when flying in air?


    read this:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drag_(physics)

    ehild
     
  5. Aug 11, 2011 #4
    For a theoretical approach, have a look at the magnus effect. This is the effect that causes balls to curve when they are translated and spun.

    The only variable dependant on absolute air pressure on the lift equation is density of the air. A higher pressure will increase the air density.

    Building a rig to test this would be nice, but how do you plan on changing the pressure of the environment? Or do you mean the effect that the air pressure in the ball has?
     
  6. Aug 11, 2011 #5
    Ya thats exactly what i mean!! Thanks for the help. I have just one problem which is the soccer ball machine. I have 2 weeks until the first draft and i've been trying alot of designs but they don't work, i burnt myself 4 times and got electrecuted!! HELP!!!
     
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