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Physics pressure problem

  1. Jun 7, 2005 #1
    Have a dilemma on this problem:
    An ice cube, density = 917 kg/m^3, is sliding down a frictionless incline of 16 degrees. The sides of the cube each have a length of 0.75 m. What pressure does the cube exert on the incline?

    Any help out there?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 7, 2005 #2

    Pyrrhus

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    What is the definition of pressure? start with that...
     
  4. Jun 7, 2005 #3
    response

    a downward force due to mass and gravity?
     
  5. Jun 8, 2005 #4

    Pyrrhus

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    What force does the cube exerts on the incline? and what side (surface) in the cube it's in contact with the incline?
     
  6. Jun 8, 2005 #5
    It exerts its weight and it is the bottom side
     
  7. Jun 8, 2005 #6

    ZapperZ

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    You really haven't managed to come up with the exact definition of "pressure". You may want to consider finding this out first.

    Zz.
     
  8. Jun 8, 2005 #7
    pressure is the force exerted on a surface divided by the area of the surface to which it is applied
     
  9. Jun 8, 2005 #8

    ZapperZ

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    So, to get pressure, first find the FORCE exerted on the surface in question. You already know the surface area.

    Zz.
     
  10. Jun 8, 2005 #9
    Well, FORCE = Mass * gravity , right?
     
  11. Jun 8, 2005 #10

    ZapperZ

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    Note that the object is on an INCLINED plane. You need to look back at problems/examples/etc. of mass on inclined plane.

    Zz.
     
  12. Jun 8, 2005 #11
    So the FORCE = m*g*cos (theta) right?
     
  13. Jun 8, 2005 #12

    Pyrrhus

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    Yes., Now find the mass.
     
  14. Jun 8, 2005 #13
    mass = density * volume ?
     
  15. Jun 8, 2005 #14

    Pyrrhus

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    Yes, Now solve the problem.
     
  16. Jun 8, 2005 #15
    Thanks. I have it now. The class I am taking is an online class and they don't give very good examples to work on before the tests which are very hard problems.
     
  17. Jun 8, 2005 #16

    Pyrrhus

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    No problem, just remember if there's a word you don't understand, look up its definition, and Welcome to PF!
     
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