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Homework Help: Physics Question Help Please

  1. Jun 6, 2010 #1
    Physics Question Help Please!! :)

    hmmm
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2010
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 6, 2010 #2

    kuruman

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    Re: Physics Question Help Please!! :)

    Hi jbravo07 and welcome to PF. We do not give answers to questions, especially "fill in the blanks" type of questions. Tell us what you think the correct answer is and why you think so. Then we will give you guidance if your reasoning goes astray.
     
  4. Jun 6, 2010 #3
    Re: Physics Question Help Please!! :)

    ummm
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2010
  5. Jun 6, 2010 #4

    kuruman

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    Re: Physics Question Help Please!! :)

    Going backwards, your answer to question 5 is correct although your reason is not complete.
    Your answer to question 4 is Ok and your reason is good.

    Now for the rest. You need to say more than just F = ma. Let's look at question 1 (we will deal with questions 2 and 3 later). How does F = ma explain that the Force required to accelerate horizontally a 500-kg mass on the Moon is less than what is required to do the same thing on the Earth? In what direction is gravity on the Earth and on the Moon, vertical, horizontal or both?
     
  6. Jun 6, 2010 #5
    Re: Physics Question Help Please!! :)

    argh
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2010
  7. Jun 6, 2010 #6

    kuruman

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    Re: Physics Question Help Please!! :)

    The acceleration of gravity (not just any acceleration) on the Moon is 1/6 that of the Earth and that acts in the vertical direction both on the Earth and on the Moon. Imagine the 500-kg mass at rest on a horizontal table (no friction). Using F = ma, how much force will be required to give it an acceleration of 2 m/s2 on the Earth? Repeat the calculation assuming that you are on the Moon.
     
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