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Studying Physics self study

  1. May 15, 2017 #1
    I am a physics student going into my 3rd year this fall. Over the summer I want to go through my textbooks and study them. My plan is the following
    • University Physics (Young and Freedman): The first 10 odd end-of-chapter problems from every chapter (440 problems total)
    • Then do the first 5 even or odd (whichever I have solutions to) in every chapter of all of my upper level physics textbooks (Classical Mechanics, Thermo, Modern, Quantum, and E&M). I have 6 books to go through, but intend on getting another E&M and maybe Optics
    I have a pretty good feeling this list is unrealistic, but my goal this summer is to get better at solving problems. Concepts I do not have too much difficulty grasping, but when handed a problem I have a very hard time figuring out even the first step. I feel like I struggle too much with problems and I cannot compare to fellow classmates because Chegg has become all the rage. Are there any recommendations for upper classmen to get better at problem solving over the summer? Thank you so much!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 15, 2017 #2
    I seriously doubt that you will be able to cover all of that in a single summer. I might be more inclined to suggest you focus mostly on one area, at least as a start. Problem solving skill gained in one area should have a significant carry-over to other areas.
     
  4. May 15, 2017 #3
    Thank you for the reply! I asked a friend for an opinion on my idea and he said the same thing, to focus on a specific area (like the classes I'll be taking) and that those problem solving skills will translate over to other problems.
     
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