Piecewise functions how to graph it

In summary, the website says to use square brackets, and it didn't work for me in my ti-83 graphing calculator. I'll include sample code if you are able to use Maple.
  • #1
laker_gurl3
94
0
Okay so i found a link online that's supposed to help you graph piecewise functions..i have a TI-83 graphing calculator and I can't seem to graph the function..
http://fym.la.asu.edu/~tturner/MAT_117_online/piecewisefunction/Piecewise.htm
http://fym.la.asu.edu/~tturner/MAT_117_online/piecewisefunction/Piecewise.htm

I'm still trying to understand how they graphed the first function. I tried putting it into the calculator like Y1= X, {-1,1} but it shows an error..can anyone guide me through it?
thanks so much
 
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  • #2
Just bumping this up, because i need to know by tomorrow :( thanks alooot in advance..
 
  • #3
I've never done piecewise functions on my calculator, and I got the first one to work fine (fx-9750).

The only thing I could suggest is you said you put Y=X,{-1,1} , whereas the website says to use square brackets? [ ]
 
  • #4
hmmm..so what did you put exactly in ur calculator? and do you have a TI-83? does it have to be on a specific mode or something?
i tried
Y1 = X,{-1,1}
and
Y1= X,[-1,1]

AFter that when i press it to graph it, it comes up as ERR: Synthax...
ahh! :(
 
  • #5
Do you have to use a Graphing Calculator?

If not, perhaps you can use Maple.

I'll include sample code in the case you are able to use Maple.

Code:
with(plots):
points := {[-1,-1],[-0.96,-0.151],[-0.86,0.894],[-0.79,0.986],[0.22,0.895],[0.5,0.5],[0.93,-0.306]}:
p := pointplot(points, color=sienna, labels=[x,y]):
p1 := -806.517475*(x+1.0)^3 + (-25)*(-0.96-x) + (-2.48457204)*(x+1.0):
one := plot(p1, x=-1..-0.96, y=-1.5..1.5, color=red):
p2 := -322.60699*(-0.86-x)^3 + (-174.2004278)*(x+0.96)^3 + 1.7160699*(-0.86-x) + (10.68200428)*(x+0.96):
two := plot(p2, x=-0.96..-0.86, color=orange):
p3 := -248.857754*(-0.79-x)^3 + (2.687788307)*(x+0.86)^3 + (13.99083157)*(-0.79-x) + (14.07254412)*(x+0.86):
three := plot(p3, x=-0.86..-0.79, color=yellow):
p4 := 0.1862823579*(0.22-x)^3 + (-0.5797228909)*(x+0.79)^3 +
(0.7862109904)*(0.22-x) + (1.477513935)*(x+0.79):
four := plot(p4, x=-0.79..0.22, color=green):
p5 := -2.091143285*(0.5-x)^3 + (-0.7539202345)*(x-0.22)^3 +
(3.360374205)*(0.5-x) + (1.844821632)*(x-0.22):
five := plot(p5, x=0.22..0.5, color=blue):
p6 := -0.4909248039*(0.93-x)^3+(1.253562694)*(0.93-x)+(-153/215)*(x-0.5):
six := plot(p6, x=0.5..0.93, y=-1.5..1.5, color=magenta):
display(p, one, two, three, four, five, six);

It generates the following graph

http://www.s119875471.onlinehome.us/piecewise.png
 
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  • #6
those sites are about graphing piecewise functions, but it's obvious it's not using a ti83, it wouldn't make sense that it'd work. Anyhow, here's a link that should help youhttp://www.acad.sunytccc.edu/instruct/sbrown/ti83/funcpc.htm
 
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Related to Piecewise functions how to graph it

1. How do you determine the domain and range of a piecewise function?

The domain of a piecewise function is determined by looking at the intervals of the function and finding the values that are allowed for the independent variable. The range is determined by looking at the output values of the function. It is important to note any restrictions or limitations in the given intervals when determining the domain and range.

2. Can a piecewise function have more than two pieces?

Yes, a piecewise function can have more than two pieces. It can have as many pieces as needed to accurately represent the function and its intervals. Each piece can have its own unique equation and interval.

3. How do you graph a piecewise function?

To graph a piecewise function, first identify the different pieces of the function and their corresponding intervals. Then, plot points for each piece of the function on the given interval. Finally, connect the points to create a continuous graph. It is important to pay attention to any restrictions or limitations in the intervals and adjust the graph accordingly.

4. What is the difference between a continuous and discontinuous piecewise function?

A continuous piecewise function is one that has a smooth and unbroken graph, meaning there are no gaps or breaks in the graph. On the other hand, a discontinuous piecewise function has gaps or breaks in the graph, which indicates a jump or a discontinuity in the function. This can occur when there is a change in the equation or the interval of the function.

5. Can piecewise functions be used to model real-life situations?

Yes, piecewise functions can be used to model real-life situations. For example, a piecewise function can be used to model the cost of a taxi ride, where the cost changes depending on the distance traveled. It can also be used to model the temperature outside, where the temperature changes depending on the time of day. Piecewise functions are useful for representing situations that have different conditions or intervals.

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