1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Pipes and forces

  1. May 23, 2006 #1
    The drawing below shows two pipes lying on top of eachother. Forces act on the different contact points, and I am to determine these as a result of the pipes' weight G. I'm able to do this graphically, but not by calculation.

    Next up is a similar problem, I'm to determine the forces at A and B, where B is a roller. Here I'm able to do it analytically, but not graphically.

    If someone could help me I'd really appreciate it :smile:
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: May 23, 2006
  2. jcsd
  3. May 23, 2006 #2
    I'm not quite sure what you mean by the second problem so I will try and point you in the right direction on the first: Consider each pipe as a free body and recall that you can sum up forces whose lines of action pass through a common point which, because I am assuming no friction (because you didn't mention any) and the fact that all surfaces are tangential, is the center of each pipe.
     
  4. May 23, 2006 #3

    Hootenanny

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    RE: Second Question
    Looks like a simple torque questio to me. What do you mean by a 'roller' at B? Which way can it rotate?

    ~H
     
  5. May 23, 2006 #4
    A roller is a type of connection. Just terminology. It only has a normal force.
     
  6. May 23, 2006 #5

    Hootenanny

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Ahh, thank you cyrus. I apologise for my ignorace; I've never heard of the term before, it is a term specific to engineering?

    To TSN
    In light of cyrus' information, this question is definatly a simple torque question.

    ~H
     
  7. May 23, 2006 #6
    I know it's a question of torque, but I can't figure out how to solve it graphically. In a graphical solution all the forces need to make an enclosed polygon, which you can use to measure the length (and therefore their magnetude). But here I can't seem to make that work.
     
  8. May 23, 2006 #7

    Hootenanny

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    This method does not work with torques I'm afraid. Is it a requirment that you solve it graphically?

    ~H
     
  9. May 23, 2006 #8
    Well, the book says to find the reactions by A and B graphically...there is no way?
     
  10. May 25, 2006 #9

    Hootenanny

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I Suppose one could measure the distances and length of F to find the torqures involved but this still would required some calculation, would this be considered graphically by your book?

    ~H
     
  11. May 25, 2006 #10
    For the second problem, you will need to know or then assume a distance from A where the force is located before you can solve the problem.
     
  12. May 26, 2006 #11

    Hootenanny

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Thats what I meant when I said measure. That is ofcourse assuming that the diagram is drawn to scale.

    ~H
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?