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Pit Bull attack

  1. Dec 23, 2009 #1

    Integral

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    Yesterday while walking my 2 medium to small dogs in the park we were attacked by a free running pit bull. Fortunately I was able to land a size 13 on the back side of the dog just as it was biting at my dog's (Riki) upper hind leg. The owner had just got out of his car with 2 Pitts and a Shepard mix. One of the pits was chasing a ball while the other 2 dogs made a bee line for me and my 2 timid lap dogs. Fortunately no one was hurt.

    During the attack the owner was several hundred feet away, he immediately began cursing at me for kicking his dog! In retrospect I see that the closer he got to me the calmer he got. 6'3" 240lb (190cm 110kg) does that sometimes. After a bit of shouting I went home and called animal control. We do have leash laws here, all dogs are supposed to be leashed,

    One of the other old duffers who walks his lap dog in he park frequently carries a club just for this reason, I sort of smiled at that as a weird quirk, no more.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2009
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  3. Dec 23, 2009 #2

    Borek

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    You may want to correct that typo :smile:
     
  4. Dec 23, 2009 #3
    Integral, my friend, you are quite large. Good thing you kicked that dog though; didn't it try to attack you after you hit it or no?
     
  5. Dec 23, 2009 #4

    Integral

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    What's a 100kg between friends! Thanks :)
     
  6. Dec 23, 2009 #5

    Integral

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    About that time the rather irate owner managed to get its attention. I still can't believe the guy, instead of apologizing for letting his dog run wild, he berated me for kicking his dog. That is what earned him the talk with law enforcement.
     
  7. Dec 23, 2009 #6

    Astronuc

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    I would have done the same thing, and if a dog persists in attacking, I'd break it's neck and/or lower jaw.

    What the heck is wrong with those people who let their aggressive dogs loose in the community?


    I had a German shepard guard dog go after my leg once. I just pivoted and used a hammer blow to the side of his head. He turned and took off. I was about 14 at the time - but I was reading to fight him.
     
  8. Dec 23, 2009 #7
    I've always wondered how easy it would be to do this while a dog was in 'attack mode'. I mean like when I'm around dogs I feel like if they decided to attack me at some point I could easily kick their face maybe grab their neck or something... but I don't know my gut feeling tells me it wouldn't turn out so great for me.
     
  9. Dec 23, 2009 #8

    Astronuc

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    I had been attacked by dogs in the past. During university I used to play with a friends Doberman who like to come at me, so I developed a technique of learning to pivot and catching her. Since then, I've had training in Tae Kwon Do and a little Shao lin Kempo.
     
  10. Dec 23, 2009 #9

    Integral

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    I have faced off several large dogs which have approached us aggressively. That is I just get in front of the dog and stand my ground with confidence (per Caesar Milan), usually this does the trick. This time there were 2 dogs and they circled us much like a pack on the attack. So I was unable to get front of either of them.
     
  11. Dec 23, 2009 #10

    BobG

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    Then you've been reading the wrong material.

    Actually, you have to be a little lucky to escape some serious damage if you get in a fight with a large animal with sharp teeth. Just like the sign at our city park warns - if a mountain lion attacks your pet, let go of the leash!
     
  12. Dec 23, 2009 #11

    Moonbear

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    It's not even about letting an "aggressive" dog loose, but any dog should be kept on a leash. You never know what might trigger them to run or get into a fight, and the only way to guarantee you have control is to have them on a leash. They make those really long retractable leashes for just that purpose, that you can give them freedom to exercise without letting them off-lead.

    You're VERY lucky Integral! That dog could have just as easily turned around and taken a chunk of your leg when you kicked it!

    I'm glad you called animal control on them. That sort of irresponsible behavior on the part of the owner doesn't bode well...letting the dogs run loose, and then getting mad at YOU after the dog tried to attack your dog?! Makes you wish you could have planted a size 13 on the backside of the owner, doesn't it? :mad:
     
  13. Dec 23, 2009 #12
    Every time I see someone kicking and hitting a dog to make it stop attacking their dog, it just doesn't seem to phase the dog. It just keeps biting and biting and ignoring the blows. Maybe they're not kicking it hard enough.
    I drove past a guy who was hitting this dog that was attacking his dog. He was hitting it and screaming at it and as I got close to it, he finally got it to stop. Then I look in my rear view mirror and the dog had went back to biting his dog, so he was freaking out, kicking and punching the dog. I don't know what happened. It was on the other side of a 4 lane road, so I wasn't in a good place to stop and help. I would've put the dog in a rear naked choke and put it to sleep.
     
  14. Dec 23, 2009 #13

    turbo

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    Good thing you were on the alert, Integral. I'd sure hate to see my dog get hurt.

    There is a couple not far from here that have a couple of Springer spaniels, and the older dog is quite aggressive and territorial. They both work and the kids are away all day with school, sports, church-group activities, etc so the dogs are hooked up on runs outside every day with no companionship or stimulation. You wouldn't normally consider a Springer a very menacing dog, but when the male manages to slip his collar he runs at my dog snarling with teeth bared, trying to get in a sneak attack while I'm restraining Duke. Certainly not very sporting behavior, but I don't want to let go of Duke's leash if the Springer wants to mix it up, because Duke has massive jaws and could easily kill the Springer. Not good.

    We have bought Duke a number of toys since rescuing him from the shelter. The only one he didn't destroy immediately was a solid-rubber Pup Treads Bone. The "dog-proof" extra heavy tennis balls from Tractor Supply are not Duke-proof. He simply crushed the first one in less than 30 seconds, so we gave the other ball to the shepherd-pit mix down the road.
     
  15. Dec 23, 2009 #14

    Integral

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    Yes I and my dogs were very lucky. I can still see that dogs mouth closing on Riki's leg. Not sure how or why we avoided a bad bite. My kick, Riki's long smooth fur?? Maybe the Pit was not really intending to hurt anyone??

    I am responsible for the safety of my dogs, much as if they are small children I will but myself between them and danger. Considering the hazards to myself only after the action.

    I was disappointed when the officer told me later that he has only given a verbal warning. The dog owner claimed that he is moving to Idaho so will not be in town any longer.

    There is another law he was in violation of, according to city law you can only have 2 dogs, this guy had three. Of course when the officer showed up on our doorstep, Partial grabbed, Galinda, our 3rd unregistered dog and headed for the bedroom!
     
  16. Dec 23, 2009 #15
    I had a good friend in seattle who owned a female pit bull. The thing was a super sweetheart and wouldn't hurt a fly on purpose. However... the animal was terrifyingly powerful. Anytime I'd play tug a war with it i'd be lucky to come back with all my fingers. I would flip my **** if an aggressive pitbull came after one of my pets. About leashes... quite often where I live i'll see an average women walking a pitbull or rottweiler and think, if that dog wants to take off, there is no way this lady can hold it back.
     
  17. Dec 23, 2009 #16
    i am guessing the pit bull never showed any aggression towards you. it may have even cowered when you scolded it. they were originally bred to be very dog-aggressive and very people-friendly.
     
  18. Dec 23, 2009 #17

    berkeman

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    I just read a good article in my JEMS magazine (EMS stuff) about dealing with dogs. They recommend carrying the small air horns that are commonly used in boating. They say you can get them at sporting good stores, although I haven't looked yet. The one pictured in the article fit in the person's hand, so it didn't look too obtrusive to carry in your jacket or fanny pack if you were out with your dog. Apparently they are quite effective in discouraging an attack, and can also break up dog fights. Think I'll get one for my EMT jump bag...
     
  19. Dec 23, 2009 #18

    turbo

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    Same story with our lab-boxer mix, Duke. He gets lot of exercise and has packed on the muscles since we brought him home in September. He is very sweet and gentle (especially with the fire-chief's tiny Pomeranian and with children) but he is extremely powerful. The Springer pulled his sneak-attack routine yesterday when my wife was taking Duke to visit his doggie friend farther up the road, and she couldn't hold onto him - she managed to keep hold of the leash, but he was hauling her around. He's only 52 pounds, but it's all bone and muscle (and the Jaws of Death).
     
  20. Dec 23, 2009 #19

    Integral

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    Yeah, I see kids, women walking dogs that if the dog decided to run all they could do is bounce along at the end of the leash. The dogs I walk total less then 50lbs, I pretty much decide where they go no matter what...

    Well actually, sometimes, little Meja will dig in and insist on deciding which way to go. I am reluctant to drag her too far. :))
     
  21. Dec 23, 2009 #20

    Integral

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    This sounds like a very good idea, I'll look into it.
     
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