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Pitch vs volume

  1. Dec 5, 2014 #1
    difference between pitch and volume?if a sound is high pitched ,doesn't it mean that sound is loud?I don't think so because loudness is related with amplitude and pitch has to do with frequency,right?BUT please someone explain how can we say whether a sound is high pitched or loud just by listening ,what's the difference between pitch and volume?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 5, 2014 #2

    anorlunda

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    I don't understand your question. As you said, we amplitude and frequency. Our ears can sense both.

    Can you rephrase your question?
     
  4. Dec 5, 2014 #3
    I just want to ask difference between high pitched sound and loud sound?
     
  5. Dec 5, 2014 #4

    phinds

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    No, it does not mean loud. Pitch and amplitude have nothing to do with each other.

    yes, that's right.

    Why is that a problem? You will hear a bomb going off a mile away will as a low-pitch boom, pretty soft. You will hear a bomb going off to you very close as low-pitched and LOUD. You will hear a police siren far away as a high-pitch sound, but quiet and you will hear a police siren right next to you as a high-pitched sound and LOUD.
     
  6. Dec 5, 2014 #5
    why sound of bomb is low pitched?
     
  7. Dec 5, 2014 #6

    jtbell

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    Consider a violin or flute playing a high-pitched note. It can be either loud or soft, at the same pitch.

    Likewise for a string bass or bassoon playing a low-pitched note. Same thing.

    Or consider a piano. Hit a key at the left end of the keyboard twice, first gently, then hard. You get the same low pitch, first soft, then loud. Do the same thing with a key at the right end of the keyboard. Same thing, but at a higher pitch.
     
  8. Dec 5, 2014 #7

    phinds

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    I don't even know how to answer that. Do you associate "BOOM" with a high pitch? I don't.
     
  9. Dec 5, 2014 #8
    The high frequencies from a distant explosion are attenuated by the air more than the low frequencies are.
     
  10. Dec 5, 2014 #9
    Higher frequency mean high pitch ? Directly
     
  11. Dec 5, 2014 #10
    'Pitch' refers to the perception of whether a sound is high (e.g. a soprano) or low (e.g. a bass); it is related to the frequency of the sound wave. A high pitch sound has a high frequency, and a low pitch sound has a low frequency.
    'Volume' refers to the perceived loudness of a sound, and this is related to the amplitude of the sound wave.
    Perceived volume does depend on frequency as well as amplitude though; a sound of 1000Hz will sound louder than a sound of 100Hz having the same amplitude. This is because the sensitivity of our ears varies with frequency. (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loudness for example.)
     
  12. Dec 5, 2014 #11

    anorlunda

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    Instead of posting notes in a forum, may I suggest thst you spend some time listening to Ravel's Bolero.
    There you will hear high pitches and low, in amplitudes from low to high in a very enjoyable way.
     
  13. Dec 5, 2014 #12
    i would listen high pitches and low, in amplitudes from low to high but i won't be able to distinguish between them .And i just want to distinguish between them
     
  14. Dec 5, 2014 #13

    sophiecentaur

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    Pitch is Frequency.
    Volume is Amplitude is commonly referred to as Loudness.
    Does anyone have a problem with that (anyone with relatively normal hearing, at least). Is this a language thing, possibly?
     
  15. Dec 5, 2014 #14
    loudness i.e high volume i know but what is high pitched sound?
     
  16. Dec 5, 2014 #15

    sophiecentaur

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    High Pitch = High FREQUENCY
    = Many cycles of oscillation per second - as with the notes at the extreme right hand side of a Piano.
    Have you considered looking in a dictionary?
     
  17. Dec 5, 2014 #16
    Thats the thing (advice) i think would help me .otherwise High Pitch = High FREQUENCY
    = Many cycles of oscillation per second
    the definition i already knew.I just want to listen high pitched sound.
     
  18. Dec 5, 2014 #17

    phinds

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    Then have a small girl scream in your ear. That way you can get high pitch and loud at the same time
     
  19. Dec 5, 2014 #18
    hmmm......... so shrill sound means high pitched sound.
     
  20. Dec 5, 2014 #19

    sophiecentaur

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    It's a pity you didn't read Post 6 properly. It would have saved us a lot of time and frustration. If you weren't familiar with the instruments quoted in that post then Google would have given you a way to hear samples of them.
     
  21. Dec 5, 2014 #20
    thanks for your advice.sorry if i wasted your time.
     
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