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Planar rotations in space.

  1. Oct 4, 2012 #1
    I've been looking at planar rotations, in a volumetric medium, for a while and came up with a rather strange solution I'd like you to take a look at.
    Taking a planar rotation where the tangential velocity at n is greater than the tangential velocity at n+1, you always get a singularity at r=0. Not to mention violating c.
    If I apply dust to the planar rotation, the dust is drawn towards the center, at the center the maths always blows up to infinity, so no matter what you do you always end up with a planar rotation that fails at r=0.
    So I ignored r=0, am I allowed to do that?
    Basically I placed a dust particulate at r=0, ignoring the singularity.
    With nowhere else to go the dust is squeezed out of the plane by the force of the dust around it, it is ejected either out of the top or bottom of the planar rotation, irregular shaped dust.
    So from there I developed a rather strange mechanism, that I have tried to animate.
    Please take a look HERE (sorry if the gif is a bit big.)
    After looking at the 'model' for a bit I realized the singularity was no longer applicable, it had been replaced with a volume within which the path of a dust particulate changes direction, the problems with r=0 in the planar rotation no longer exist.
    Volume of indeterminate dust paths

    It looks very nearly like the crab nebula.
    crab animation
    crab close up image

    The really weird thing is that when the dust is stopped, when it's consumed, the two rotating toroids in the animation close up, the resulting shape is almost perfectly spherical, like the sun, but with a similar mechanism in the middle.

    I've seen the shapes this mechanism produces alot in astronomy, and it's sending me loopy in the head, am I seeing that mechanism (whatever it is) in everything, or am I just projecting something I've conjured up?
     
  2. jcsd
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