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Planck length and dimension

  1. Nov 11, 2012 #1
    Hello all .
    We know Planck length is d2cad119035d71a07b70493b04b85e13.png and universe was in that density at big bang .

    Is that mean there was dimension at that time ?
    I mean , can we move in Planck length ? like up , down, right, left, forward, backward ؟
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 11, 2012 #2

    mfb

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    I don't understand these questions.

    I am quite sure that we can move up, down, right, left, forward, backward. Note that those 6 directions are arbitrary definitions based on your current orientation in space.
     
  4. Nov 11, 2012 #3
    what's initial size of the universe at big bang ? there was any direction at that moment ?
     
  5. Nov 11, 2012 #4

    phinds

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    The general theory is that "size" is not a meaningful question about the singularity as we currently understand it. It was everything there is, so either (1) finite but unbounded or (2) infinite.

    In any case it had no center, no edge, and no direction.
     
  6. Nov 11, 2012 #5
    How about in loop quantum gravity ?
    The new theory and other new theory such as m-theory ( Brane ) said there was any singularity at that moment
    So can we consider any direction at that moment ?

    bounce-ns.jpg
     
  7. Nov 11, 2012 #6

    mfb

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    I don't think you use "direction" and "dimension" the same way physics usually does. As a result, your questions look strange (at least to me) and I don't know how to interpret them.
     
  8. Nov 11, 2012 #7
    Al right !
    You consider direction and dimension is same ! and replace "dimension" to "direction" in my question .

    So if we don't consider any singularity at big bang , can we say we have dimension or direction at that moment ?
     
  9. Nov 16, 2012 #8

    phinds

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    This seems to be an exceptionally poor representation of anything realistic. Two problems jump right out at you

    First, "space-time is classical" is nonsensical. Space and time are classical things, space-time is not.

    Second, the time scale is just weird. I mean, "today" is 10E17 seconds and the first galaxies are 10E16 seconds. So galaxies just started forming 10 seconds ago? Doesn't seem likely.
     
  10. Nov 17, 2012 #9

    mfb

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    If you consider "classical" as "not quantum-mechanical" (but allow special relativity), it is fine.

    10E17s=1017s (~3 billion years)
    10E16=1016 (~300 million years)
    10E17-10E16=9*1016 (~2700 million years)

    The universe is older than 3 billion years, but the order of magnitude is still correct.

    3 spatial dimensions plus one time dimension, as usual. Plus some (undiscovered) extradimensions, maybe.
     
  11. Nov 17, 2012 #10
    10^17-10^16= 9e16s or 90'000'000'000'000'000s seconds.
    Not ten seconds. This a logarithmic scale.
     
  12. Nov 17, 2012 #11

    phinds

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    doh !
     
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