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Playing piano

  1. Aug 30, 2004 #1

    Monique

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    What are some impressive compositions to play on a piano? I'm trying to master Für Elise by Beethoven and am having a lot of fun doing so :biggrin:
     
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  3. Aug 30, 2004 #2

    dduardo

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    Chopin's Nocturnes are my favorite to play.
     
  4. Aug 30, 2004 #3

    jimmy p

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    Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen (who else?? :biggrin: ) is a pretty cool song to learn to play. Quite a challenge too.
     
  5. Aug 30, 2004 #4
    I just finished "graduating" Chopin's nocturnes ! I am now turning to Beethoven & Schubert sonatas, which begins to be really serious classical music. But I think, if "Fur Elise" is really easy at your level, give a try to Liszt's hugarian rhapsodie n2 (ut# minor). Free download (sshhh ! it's a secret :wink: )
    http://partitions.metronimo.com/index.php?cat=265
    This is one of my favorite piano sheet, and I believe with a few of time, one can master it. When you have mastered this hugarian rhapsodie, you can turn to Beethoven piano sonata "Hammerklavier". Playing this sonata in concert is among the most beautiful dreams of any piano player.

    I am warning you : this is more difficult than "Fur Elise" but playing "Fur Elise" requires only few technical skills. It is more in the interpretation.
     
  6. Aug 30, 2004 #5

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    Am I uncultivated in believing the "Moonlight (moonshine?) Sonata" to be by Beethoven? (:redface:)
    Anyways, I like it (and I hope it Is for piano..:redface:)
     
  7. Aug 30, 2004 #6

    Monique

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  8. Aug 30, 2004 #7

    Monique

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    You're right :smile: http://www.mfiles.co.uk/Scores/moonlight-movement1.htm
    ps: really download the scorch plug-in, I'm amazed by it :eek:
     
  9. Aug 30, 2004 #8
    Somewhere in time
     
  10. Aug 30, 2004 #9

    Chi Meson

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    The most satisfying set of pieces I have been able to play are the first three variations of JS Bach's "Goldberg Variations." There are thirty-oned parts in total of this masterpiece, and some simply cannot be played unless you are very very very (very) good, but there are plenty that can be played by at least an intermediate player.
     
  11. Aug 30, 2004 #10
    Yeah, what's the point of begining the sonata (for instance) and not finishing it ? If you begin the Moonlight, you will notice that the first part sounds trivial. Wait till you get to last part :surprise:

    The problem is : usually Moonlight is played by old masters, and therefore the interpretation of the first (slow) movement of Moonlight should be... as good as possible.

    dduardo gave the best advice : if you are able to play "Fur Elise", the next step is the nocturnes by Chopin. Playing everyday, you should master them in a few months (typically 6 moths). Then you can switch to Schubert and/or Beethoven sonatas = real good classical music.

    Chi Meson : are not "Goldberg Variations" even more difficult than Liszt's hugarian rhapsodies ? Bach should be considered as one of the most difficult (well-tempered clavier. Sonata & Partita for violin...) because there is almost no room for interpretation. It is very mechanical and precise. On the contrary, Chopin's nocturnes offer a real lot of room for interpretation, they are even supposed to look improvised. Truth is : Chopin really improvised them in public, and wrote a few of them a really liked !
     
  12. Aug 30, 2004 #11
    I very much enjoy playing ostensibly simple pieces with an emotional capacity that is difficult to convey. It's these pieces that touch me deeply when listening or playing, and I find it requires an entirely different facet of my mind. Some examples that immediately come to mind are: Beethoven's 14th Piano Sonata, Adagio Sostenuto; Beethoven's 8th Piano Sonata, Adagio Cantabile; Chopin's Nocturne, Opus 72; Mozart's 23rd Piano Concerto, Allegro (this somewhat aberrates from what I mean by ostensibly simple, but the opening to this piece epitomizes my meaning).

    I only play such pieces with appropriate emotional conveyance when alone, because it's simply not an experience I can share with others. I guess I just hold dear a great deal of reverence for such pieces.
     
  13. Aug 30, 2004 #12

    Monique

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    6 (!!!) months? :bugeye: *gulp*

    I never got past reading notes and playing some simple tunes with static hands, the first two parts of Für Elise were really easy, the rest quite a bit more challenging :wink: I'll try to get my hands on Chopin..
     
  14. Aug 30, 2004 #13
    Descartes : you have a great taste. I think I hear your meaning here, and it touchs me. I also don't really enjoy sharing piano feelings. I play bass guitar in a band, and there sharing with a public is essential.

    I have a 5-CD box of Chostakovich's string quartets : they have been recorded in public, because they say after having playing the quatuor for a while, they noticed the intensity was stronger in public. They argue that, just as in theater, the public is the last member of "the band". I have not experienced that with classical music. Only with "popular" music.
     
  15. Aug 30, 2004 #14
    if you play piano 2 hours a day, you get so addicted. It becomes really difficult not to have your piano everyday. I swear.
     
  16. Aug 30, 2004 #15

    Monique

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    I know :smile: I was already playing Für Elise in half a day, but I'm amazed by how the piece continues to develop as I play it more: I don't even have to look anymore where I place my hands or don't have to think what notes to play and am able to put more emotion into it, even though I just have a keyboard and not a real piano :frown:
     
  17. Aug 30, 2004 #16

    graphic7

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    Ah, Beethoven fanatics..

    Well, I'm quite a Debussy fan. Debussy has a whole different mood and tone than that of Beethoven. It was Debussy's goal in some of his pieces to bring about imagery to a listener. One excellent example of this is in "The Sunken Cathedral" or "La cathédrale engloutie", where he conveys the image of a sunken cathedral rising out of the water. This is probably my most favorite piece of his to play, rather difficult, but most rewarding - tons of flats :smile: . If you're really wanting a challenge go for "Claire de Lune".

    If you've never played any Debussy before, I'll suggest a simpler piece but still very rewarding, "A girl with flaxen hair" (too lazy to do the French translation). Once you get through this piece you should be very used to the keys and chordes that Debussy uses in all of his pieces.

    Debussy is completely different than any composer I've heard. Very relaxing and elegant.

    Edit: 4th Arabesque is another excellent piece of Debussy's to endulge yourself in. Arabesque is interesting in the fact that Debussy's uses the treble clef for the bass line - something you don't see too often.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2004
  18. Aug 30, 2004 #17
    Nobody bringing in Jazz yet ? Many great things to play when you begin piano in Jazz/Blues/Samba... I love Thelonious Monk's style. The advantage is : he uses very few notes. You won't have to bother a 4 or 5 fingers chord. Disadvantage : really uncommomn conception of rythm ! Hard to get in the style of Thelonious Sphere Monk, but once you are in there...
     
  19. Aug 30, 2004 #18
    i liked mozart's sonatta's. they're really fast paced and move around a lot. i thought they were really fun! it took me a while to be able to play them fast, but the sound really good now.
     
  20. Aug 30, 2004 #19
    Yes, playing fast in itself is sometimes a lot of fun. I have a lot of pieces that I play to warm-up: Mozart's Ronda Alla Turca, Bach's Inventions, and other similar pieces. If only I could play Bach's Inventions as well and as fast as Glenn Gould. Well, if I could do that, then I could do the Goldberg Variations equally well.

    I also very much enjoy piano arrangements of violin solo or orchestral pieces. I love [trying] to play the Chaconne from Bach's Partita #2 for the piano. To me it's almost a violent piece, and I love that. Glenn Gould plays an equally violent Beethoven's Fifth for the piano. Hearing him play the final bars is incredible, in my opinion. Perhaps violent isn't the best word, but I believe everyone will get my meaning. It just gets to a point where it's almost painfully complex, but yet perfect. Finally, I think a lot of Bach's Fugues are fun to play on the piano.
     
  21. Aug 30, 2004 #20
    Who's your favorite interpret of Mozart's piano piece ?
    Brendel ? Barenboim ? Moravek ? Horowitz ? Arau ? Richter ? Gould ? Kempff ?
    (this does not include mine :tongue2: )
     
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