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Please, a new nu!

  1. Sep 12, 2003 #1
    please, a "new" nu!

    I suppose I should be complaining to the vBulletin folks!

    The glyph for the escape coding "& nu ;" (scrunched together!) is just a lower case v. If I am writing math expressions with both an ordinary velocity and a frequency term, this makes for ambiguity.

    I guess I can use smilie "[ nu ]" (scrunched together!), but these tend to appear above the text line.

    TFYP!

    a "& nu ;" and a "v":
    abcνdef...stuvwxyz
    ---> -------->

    a smilie "nu":
    abc[nu]def
    --->
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2003 #2

    Hurkyl

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    Nah, you need to complain to the people who created the fonts.

    The times new roman font is easily the best font for greek letters. To use it, type

    <font=times new roman> text </font>

    but use square brackets [] instead of angle brackets <>

    Rewriting your post encapslated in this font tag will yield:


    I suppose I should be complaining to the vBulletin folks!

    The glyph for the escape coding "& nu ;" (scrunched together!) is just a lower case v. If I am writing math expressions with both an ordinary velocity and a frequency term, this makes for ambiguity.

    I guess I can use smilie "[ nu ]" (scrunched together!), but these tend to appear above the text line.

    TFYP!

    a "& nu ;" and a "v":
    abc&nu;def...stuvwxyz
    ---> -------->

    a smilie "nu":
    abc[nu]def
    --->


    If this is too small, then also wrap it in <size=3> </size> tags.
     
  4. Sep 12, 2003 #3
    Hmm!

    &nu;'/&nu; = (c + v).5/(c - v).5

    Gee! That's neat!

    TFYH!
     
  5. Sep 12, 2003 #4

    Tom Mattson

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    You can also use the "symbol" font.

    <font=symbol>n</font>

    again, with [] instead of <>.

    You'll get: n
     
  6. Sep 12, 2003 #5
    Oh, yes! I couldn't remember that font name. That has all kinds of good stuff, including cards pips: §¨©ª, very useful when discussing probability examples.
     
  7. Sep 12, 2003 #6

    Hurkyl

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    Unfortunately, the symbol font is a little less universal; the four symbols you posted don't look anything like card suits, and the 'nu' that tom posted looks like an 'n'.
     
  8. Sep 12, 2003 #7
    Yikes! There oughta be a law!
     
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