1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Please help: Converting graphs

  1. Sep 26, 2009 #1
    So i am in Grade 11. I have the worst teacher in the school, she cannot teach 4 ****. I need to know how to do you convert a Position/ Time graph into a Velocity/ Time graph and how do you convert a velocity/time graph into a position/time graph???

    - PLz if someone could help me out with this. I would greatly appreciate it
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 26, 2009 #2

    rock.freak667

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    maybe your teacher just doesn't know how to relate the material to you.


    But anyhow use the definition of velocity to help with conversion.

    The gradients in a position (displacement)/time graph gives the velocity in that interval.

    The area under the graph in a time interval in the velocity-time graph gives the displacement.
     
  4. Sep 26, 2009 #3
    bro no one in the class understands it.. n can u explain in simpler terms
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2009
  5. Sep 26, 2009 #4

    rock.freak667

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Read this http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/1DKin/u1l3a.cfm" [Broken]. I can't really explain it properly without an example.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Sep 26, 2009 #5
    From the definition of velocity, the graph of the velocity is the graph of the derivative function of the function giving position as a function of time (just like the graph y = 2x is the graph of the derivative function of the function f(x) = x2). You should be familiar with doing this from your first calculus class.
    Likewise, position is the integral of velocity over time (otherwise known as the area under the graph of velocity as a function of time from 0 to t). Likewise, creating an approximation of this graph based on the graph of velocity versus time should be familiar from your calculus course.
    If you are sketchy on the details, http://people.hofstra.edu/stefan_waner/Realworld/calctopic1/derivgraph.html [Broken] may jog your memory.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Please help: Converting graphs
Loading...