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Please help me decide my second major

  1. Jul 7, 2011 #1
    I'm going for my BS in pure math at a state university. However, I know it's pretty difficult to find a job with a pure math degree, so now I'm trying to find a second major that will help me find a job after I graduate. Ultimately, I want to go to grad school, but I know that I have to work a little first so that I can actually afford to further my education. I've narrowed my second major options to statistics, or this new degree program offered at my school called computational science. I'm leaning a bit toward computational science, just because it looks interesting, but I'm still having second thoughts. A little bit of help is appreciated!

    Thanks,
    S
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 7, 2011 #2
    I guess it depends on the field you are interested in for Grad school. Math goes hand in hand with physics, and is just as useful.
    I am confused do you want a job after you graduate or to go to grad school? If the former, maybe engineering would have been the best choice. If it is grad school i would think Mathematics or Computer science would help. I do not know your exact plans though.
     
  4. Jul 7, 2011 #3
    I believe that it's a misconception that it's difficult to find a job with a pure math degree. It's been my impression that a math degree is among the most marketable and versatile degrees around. Certainly with a Master's in math, your options expand even further.

    Check out these links. I think they're fairly interesting and relevant.

    http://www.toroidalsnark.net/mathcareers.html
    http://www.math.duke.edu/major/whyMajor.html

    If you want to double major because you're interested in other areas of study as well, by all means, go for it (and for what it's worth, Computational Sciences does sound compelling), but I don't think you need to just to stand a chance of getting grad school or employment opportunities. Math can be a difficult enough degree that there's no need to burden yourself unless you truly want to.
     
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