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Plotting Straight Line Graphs

  • Thread starter Peter G.
  • Start date
  • #1
442
0
So, I have to assess the relationship between the Constant of a Spring and the Time Period of Oscillations.

I have researched the equation that links the two and I know that to have a straight line graph I need to plot:

T2 against 1/K

However, I do not know why; how I get to that conclusion.

I have read about log-log graphs and played around with the concept to see if it would yield the plot I mentioned above. I tried plotting for the log of T against the log of K and I did get a straight line plot. I checked if my gradient was equal to -0.5 and my y-intercept was equal to (log 2∏-0.5 log m) and they were, but I still do not understand why I have to plot T2 against 1/K.

Can anyone please shed some light onto this please?

Thanks in advance!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
rock.freak667
Homework Helper
6,230
31
You are asked to plot that because of the derivation of the periodic time formula for a spring oscillation.

The final equation is

[tex]T = 2 \pi \sqrt{\frac{m}{k}}[/tex]

If you square both sides you will get


[tex]T^2 = \frac{4 \pi ^2 m}{k}[/tex]

Which is the form Y=MX where Y = T2 and X = 1/k.

Thus plotting Y vs X i.e. T2 vs. 1/k will give you a straight line. So you can get the mass oscillating if you desire from the gradient of the graph you plotted.
 
  • #3
20,199
4,247
I like your idea of using a log-log plot much better. I have over 40 years of experience as a practicing engineer, and that is the way I would do it. Congratulations on thinking out of the box.

Chet
 

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