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Homework Help: Polar Integral Question

  1. Oct 23, 2005 #1
    I'm not sure if I'm doing this conversion correctly. I have to convert the following double integral into polar. The integration part I can do, I just want to make sure I converted correctly. And sorry about the formatting bc I don't kno how to do the math formatting.


    Int(Int((x^2+y^2))dy)dx
    the bounds on the outer integral are -1 to 1
    the bounds on the inner integral are -sqrt(1-y^2) to sqrt (1-y^2)

    now here is what I got converting it to polar

    Int(Int(r^3)dr)dtheta
    outer bounds = 0 to 2pi
    inner bounds = 0 to 1

    Did I do the conversion correctly?
    Thanks for the help
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 24, 2005 #2

    Galileo

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    Lookin' good, but in the first integral the bounds on the inner integral should be -sqrt(1-x^2) to sqrt (1-x^2).
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2005
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