Polar molecule

  • Chemistry
  • Thread starter bjoyful
  • Start date
  • #1
bjoyful
61
0
A diatomic molecule XY that contains a polar bond must be a polar molecule. A triatomic molecule XY2 that contains a polar bond does not necessarily form a polar molecule. I need some examples of real molecules to help me explain the difference.

Thanks
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
chemisttree
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Gold Member
3,692
692
Look at CO2
 
  • #3
bjoyful
61
0
concentration of hydrogen ions

oops...posted wrong message:(
 
Last edited:
  • #4
bjoyful
61
0
so you are saying to look at CO2 as an example?
 
  • #5
Snazzy
468
0
so you are saying to look at CO2 as an example?


That's what he/she said.
 
  • #6
bjoyful
61
0
so I guess my question should become a little more specific...can someone tell me how (or give me a website) CO2 demonstates this?!
 
  • #7
LtStorm
75
0
Look at CO2, compare it to H2O.
 
  • #8
bjoyful
61
0
..
CO2 = :O::C::O:
..

H2O = H::O::H

So I compared them this way, but am I using the right method for this problem? I know that H2O is a polar covalent bonds forming a polar covalent molecule. But carbon is my center in CO2, not oxygen as it is in H2O. Help:(

edit: my dots are suppose to be over the carbon to represent non bonded pairs...
 
  • #9
Kushal
438
1
hint: CO2 is linear and H2O is bent

a molecule is polar when it has a side with a partial negative charge and the opposite side with a partial positive charge.

try to locate these partial charges on the molecules.
 
  • #10
clouded.perception
61
0
H2O does not have any double bonds, BTW; its electron distribution is why it's a different shape to CO2 (as Kushal pointed out). Only vaguely related to the question, but an important concept.
 

Suggested for: Polar molecule

  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
885
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
21
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
5K
Replies
4
Views
4K
Top