Polish notation

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Nidum
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This thread follows on from : https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/off-topic-maths-query-not-worthy-of-maths-forum.880724/#post-5534559 .

Anybody ever used Polish notation or reverse Polish notation for computational formulae ? Use of either is supposed to eliminate ambiguity and make the flow of computations logical .

I only ask out of curiosity . The very expensive HP programmable calculator we had at Mtu during the late 1970's had reverse Polish notation input . That is the only real world use I have ever come across .
 

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  • #2
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I still have the HP 11C I bought in college in 1982. It still works great, and you gotta love RPN.
 
  • #3
NascentOxygen
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RPN is a tool of trade of the serious number crunching scientist. I'm sure there would be plenty of apps featuring a RPN calculator for whatever tablet you own. The RPN calculator keypad doesn't need an equals sign nor parentheses, i.e., "(" and ")".

To evaluate 6 × (7 - 2 ÷ 3) + 5 you would typically enter the keystrokes in this order:
6 7 2 3 ÷ - × 5 +

Maybe you can see why this is also known as post-fix notation?

If you have access to linux, you'll find that the utility known as "dc" is a commandline RPN calculator. (It is also of unlimited precision, meaning you can set it to give you an answer to thousands of sig figs.)
 
  • #4
NTW
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You can still find the HP35s, and another model, I don't remember the name now, for financial calculations.
Besides, and for nostalgics, you have the 'SwissMicros': https://www.swissmicros.com/
To my knowledge, there are no other brands of RPN calculators. Well, perhaps in Russia... In Soviet times, there used to be a few models...
 
  • #5
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You can still find the HP35s, and another model, I don't remember the name now, for financial calculations.
Besides, and for nostalgics, you have the 'SwissMicros': https://www.swissmicros.com/
To my knowledge, there are no other brands of RPN calculators. Well, perhaps in Russia... In Soviet times, there used to be a few models...
I think TI calculators used it, too, as far as I remember. And it's useful to know, when it comes to pushdown automatons.
 
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Ben Niehoff
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I still own an HP 49-G that uses RPN. I never use it anymore, though, since I have Mathematica on my laptop
 
  • #8
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I think TI calculators used it, too, as far as I remember. And it's useful to know, when it comes to pushdown automatons.
Before I bought my first HP11C in 1982, I used TI calculators. They were not RPN. Maybe they changed over the years.
 
  • #9
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You can still find the HP35s, and another model, I don't remember the name now, for financial calculations.
Besides, and for nostalgics, you have the 'SwissMicros': https://www.swissmicros.com/
To my knowledge, there are no other brands of RPN calculators. Well, perhaps in Russia... In Soviet times, there used to be a few models...
That would be the HP 12C, I had one of those too when I was in the MBA program.
 
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Nidum
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EnumaElish
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Begin off-topic

Casio and Sharp had basic-programmable calculators.

End off-topic
 

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