Politics in the Church

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Gokul43201
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As a non-churchgoer I'm a bit of an ignoramus on churchly matters. So I'm a "little" behind on what's considered the norm when it comes to the influence of the church on one's electoral decision.

I recently heard from a devout Christian (and slightly Republican) friend that the head pastor (I think she called him the 'Lord Pastor' ??) at her church makes political speeches (every week, for the last few months) that expound the virtues of the Republican agenda and criticize the ideas the Liberals stand for. The preacher never actually names a specific person, but the message is clear. Is this okay ? Does it happen everywhere, or is this just an aberration.

This church is probably Columbus' (Ohio, USA) largest, and hosts tens of thousands (during conventions, at least - I've dropped a friend off there once). Frequently hosting prominent (I'll save the other adjectives for another day) personalities like Benny Hinn, this church has a huge sphere of influence.

So again, are there rules or ethics regarding preaching politics, or is it 'no holds barred' ?
 

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Tsu
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The church that I attend does not presume to preach politics to its members. In fact, I do not even know if my church HAS a 'political stance'. It wouldn't matter to me anyway. Its not my churches politics that we push. Its community and helping the less fortunate in our community that keeps me at my church. Plus, I am a Deacon and I like the things that we do as a group. That is not to say that many 'community' (read 'fundamentalist') churches do not do this (at least the ones that I have attended with friends have been VERY politically biased). I think this 'politicizing from the pulpit' has increased considerably in the past years, and I also feel that this is what has brought religion back into politics in this country - and it's too bad. We (Americans) left England for that very reason. I like the way europe and Canada have been successful in keeping religion out of their politics.
 
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This is one of the reasons I'm against organized religion all to gether. People need to learn to think for themselves, not do whatever they're church tells them to.
 
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Gokul43201
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I didn't intend this thread to be a rant against the role of religion in politics. In fact, that's not what it's about, at all. I'm merely hoping for some legal/ethical clarification on whether there are restrictions upon churches, like there used to be with the media (before Reagan) - or even whether or not there should be any restrictions, in your opinion.

What others choose to post is not in my control, but I'd like if someone could answer my question.

Tsu : I gather from your post that politically biased sermons are not uncommon.
 
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I don't think a church is allowed to endorse anyone specifically, or they lose out on their tax break. Not certain though.
 
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Tsu
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Gokul43201 said:
I didn't intend this thread to be a rant against the role of religion in politics. In fact, that's not what it's about, at all. I'm merely hoping for some legal/ethical clarification on whether there are restrictions upon churches, like there used to be with the media (before Reagan) - or even whether or not there should be any restrictions, in your opinion.

What others choose to post is not in my control, but I'd like if someone could answer my question.

Tsu : I gather from your post that politically biased sermons are not uncommon.
At my church, they are non-existant. Some of the 'community' church services I've attended are not blatantly political, but there is usually no mistaking what they are saying...and to me it sounds very un-christian like. But then again, these very people have also told me that, since I don't believe and practice christianity they way they do, I'm going to hell!! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: I've had my fill of my friends fundamentalist christian churches. :surprised :biggrin: I'm glad they've finally cleaned up their act and 'found God', but their better-than-thou attitudes of being 'born again' leave me cold.
 
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I had my fill of Christians back in Christian elemantary/high schools. I decided early on I'd have nothing to do with the hypocrisy of the church.

I recall some months ago, an Episcopalian newspaper delivery guy, used to preach to me when he'd come deliver to my work. He'd give me these little tract pamphlets, preaching how the apocalypse is near and if I don't get with their church I would burn in hell. And just to add a little incentive, the pamphlet had a nice little picture, of some dudes suffering and burning in hell.
 

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