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Polyglots/Multilinguists: I need your help!

  1. Aug 16, 2005 #1

    honestrosewater

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    I only need one person for this assignment, but the more, the merrier. :biggrin: This is an actual assignment from my book - I'm not just making it up for my own amusement.

    I need someone who speaks a language other than English to please
    1) name your language,
    2) translate the following sentences into your language,
    (a) Desdemona will marry a Moor.
    (b) Macbeth has killed the king.​
    3) identify what each word or word segment of your translation means in English (as best as you can)
    4) identify which class (ex. noun, verb, preposition, etc.) each word or word segment of your translation falls into (as best as you can), and
    5) Construct two additonal sentences in your language that follow the same word class pattern.
    For example, in (a) and (b), the word class pattern in English is
    Name - auxiliary - verb - determiner - noun​
    So similar sentences would be
    Ophelia must sing that song.
    honestrosewater should thank these people.​

    If this example only confuses you, just ignore it.
    I am reading​
    1) Swahili
    2) Ninasoma
    3) Ni-na-soma
    I-present-read
    4) subject marker - tense marker - verb (the whole word can be considered a verb, or one can call ni- a noun and na- an auxiliary; whatever seems best to you.)
    5) Watasema (Wa-ta-sema, They-future-speak, They will speak)
    Tulisema (Tu-li-sema, We-past-speak, We spoke)

    I truly appreciate it!
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2005
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 6, 2005 #2

    honestrosewater

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    *bump*
    It would only take a minute. o:)
     
  4. Sep 7, 2005 #3

    loseyourname

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    Here's some Irish for you:

    (a) Pósfaidh Desdemona muislín. (pósfaidh = will marry, Desdemona = Desdemona, muislín = muslim or moor)

    Verb, Subject, Object

    Dúnfaidh mé an doras.* (I will shut the door.)
    Aimseoidh mé an balla. (I will hit the wall.)

    *Technically, these sentences are different in Irish (the second is Verb, Subject, Article, Object) because there is no indefinite article, so "a moor" just becomes "muislín," but the structures are identical when translated into English.

    (b) Mharaíodh Macbeth Roinn Bhinse an Rí. (mharaíodh = has killed, Macbeth = Macbeth, Roinn Bhinse an Rí = king, or more literally, something like "the leader of the state council")

    Verb, Subject, Object (with imbedded definite article)

    Dhúnadh Rachel an doras. (Rachel will shut the door.)
    D'aimsíodh Rachel an balla. (Rachel will hit the wall.)
     
  5. Sep 7, 2005 #4

    honestrosewater

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    Thanks, that's excellent. What's with the -dh on the verbs? Is it not a tense marker? You're positive that mharaíodh is the past tense? I trust you, just making sure it wasn't a small mistake.
     
  6. Sep 8, 2005 #5

    loseyourname

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    It's usually an indicator of third-person singular and first-person plural conjugations of the indicative perfect tense and for all tenses, except second-person plural, of the future tense - it can also be used to make a verbal noun for some kinds of verbs. The switch to indicative perfect (he/she has) is distinguished from future by the switch of the initial consonant from m to mh (which results in a "wa" sound, instead of "ma"). The -dh at the end of a word is silent, by the way.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2005
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