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Position of a particle

  • Thread starter ch2kb0x
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  • #1
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i got the answer. thanks
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
Perillux
Theres a few ways to solve it.
You could graph it (like you were thinking). Because the velocity (change in position with time) should be 0 then just look for wherever the slope is equal to 0. There should be 2 times when this happens.

OR, you could take the derivative of that equation and graph that, then it's velocity is 0 simply wherever the graph is equal to 0. (still 2 spots)

OR you could just do it mathematically, which would be the second method above, but instead of graphing, just set it to 0 and solve for t. I think you'll need the quadratic equation if you do it this way.
 
  • #3
Redbelly98
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... OR you could just do it mathematically, which would be the second method above, but instead of graphing, just set it to 0 and solve for t. I think you'll need the quadratic equation if you do it this way.
If ch2kb0x has had some calculus, that is the way to go. The Quadratic Formula won't be necessary for this problem.

Without calculus, graphing is the way to go.
 
  • #4
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I took the derivative and graphed it. I got t=0 and t=13 when the curve hits 0 on the "t-axis", but that seems to be the incorrect answer. any help?
 
  • #5
Redbelly98
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You deleted the question, so how can we help you? Please don't delete whole posts like that after people have already responded to it.
 

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