Positron are point particles

In summary, there is a theory that the electron borrows energy from "vacuum energy" to explain why it doesn't collide with the nucleus. Other theories exist for why the electron does not radiate its energy away and collapse into the nucleus, but there is no real concept of perpetual motion in the quantum world. The closest example is the photon.
  • #1

wolram

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im out of my depth with this question so forgive me if it is stupid.
it is stated that the electron borrows energy from "vacuum energy",
as the eletron, positron are point particles i was thinking that they could be a,

real world manifestation of the hidden world of vacuum energy.
best wishes.
 
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  • #2


Originally posted by wolram
im out of my depth with this question so forgive me if it is stupid.
it is stated that the electron borrows energy from "vacuum energy",
as the eletron, positron are point particles i was thinking that they could be a,

real world manifestation of the hidden world of vacuum energy.
best wishes.

That it borrows vacuum energy is really just a theory at this point. It's ment to explain why the electron doesn't expel energy to the point that it collides with the nucleus. I haven't heard much about it lately.
 
  • #3
are there other theories as to why the electron does not
radiate its energy away and collaps into the nucleus?
i know that in the real world there is no sutch thing
as perpetual motion, but is that true for the quantum
world?
the closest thing i can think of for perpetual motion is the
photon.
 

What is a positron?

A positron is a type of subatomic particle that has the same mass as an electron, but with a positive charge instead of a negative charge.

What are point particles?

Point particles are particles that are considered to have no size or volume, and are described as existing at a single point in space. They are often used in physics models to simplify calculations and understand the behavior of larger particles.

How are positrons different from electrons?

Positrons and electrons have the same mass and spin, but they have opposite charges. This means that they interact differently with other particles and can be used for different purposes in scientific research and technology.

How are positrons created?

Positrons can be created through various processes, such as radioactive decay, high-energy collisions, and pair production in particle accelerators. They can also be created in small amounts through natural processes, such as cosmic ray interactions in the Earth's atmosphere.

Why are positrons important in scientific research?

Positrons have unique properties that make them useful for studying the fundamental forces and structures of the universe. They are also used in medical imaging and cancer treatment, as well as in the development of new technologies in fields such as energy and materials science.

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