Positron Theory Explained: Electric Neutral Atoms

In summary, the conversation discusses the Dirac hole theory and its application in explaining the existence of electric neutral atoms. The theory proposes that the space must have an infinite positive charge, but this has been replaced by the quantum field theory. Some argue that the Dirac hole theory can still be used to solve certain problems in relativistic quantum mechanics, but it may not be applicable to all particles. The conversation also touches on the concept of negative energy and anti-particles in QM.
  • #1
Kruger
214
0
In sense of the Dirac hole theory the space must have a charge that is infiniti positive. Why do then electric neutral atoms exist?
 
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  • #2
Where did u get that conclusion...?:bugeye:

Daniel.
 
  • #3
There is an equation E^2=m^2p^2+m^2c^4 and of course it has negative energy solutions. So an electron could emit photons until it is in a infinite negative energy state. To prevent that Dirac said that all negative energy states in an atom are filled (Pauli exclusion principle). And if there are all states field there must be an infiniti charge. You see?
 
  • #4
What are positrons doing in electronic atoms...?

Daniel.
 
  • #5
Kruger said:
In sense of the Dirac hole theory the space must have a charge that is infiniti positive. Why do then electric neutral atoms exist?

But the Dirac theory has been out of date, replaced by QFT. In QFT, the space is not full of positron, and your question is solved.

But I think even using Dirac's theory, the problem can also be sattled. Because if the space is full filled with positron, the force related with the positron are canceled because of the uniformity of spacetime. As the
EM force is linear, the force we feel is the departure, that is, force produced by electrons or holes. So we call them charge, instead of calling the real charge in space "charge". This is only a matter of definition.

I hope this would be helpful.

regards.
wangyi
 
  • #6
wangyi said:
But the Dirac theory has been out of date, replaced by QFT. In QFT, the space is not full of positron, and your question is solved.

That is incorrect. Dirac theory is essential in QM and relativistic QM. QFT is the unification of both QM and special relativity so the things you say can't be true by simple definition.

I also don't understand what the original poster is talking about. Please, elaborate on your conceptual problem

marlon
 
  • #7
I have solved my problems. Sorry that the post was so weird.
 
  • #8
marlon said:
That is incorrect. Dirac theory is essential in QM and relativistic QM. QFT is the unification of both QM and special relativity so the things you say can't be true by simple definition.

I also don't understand what the original poster is talking about. Please, elaborate on your conceptual problem

marlon

I only say the Dirac hole theory, not the hole Dirac theory, sorry for not saying clearly.

In my opinion, the Dirac hole theory is not very useful in non-relativistic QM because no nagative energy accured from the Pauli equation. In relativistic QM, the Dirac hole theory may slove some difficulties, to say, the nagative energy of the 1/2 spin particle. But the method can not pass through to spin 0 and spin 1 particles. The charged scalar particle's negative energy and anti-particle can not be worked out in the same way, but they accually exists as \pi^{\pm}. The same reason for W^{\pm}, H^{\pm}, etc. so the relativistic QM contains inconsistency inside itself. And the modern experiments are not relativistic QM flavored, but support QED.

thank you for pointing out my weakpoint, and eager to discuss:)
 

Related to Positron Theory Explained: Electric Neutral Atoms

1. What is positron theory and how does it explain electric neutral atoms?

Positron theory is a scientific concept that explains how electric neutral atoms are formed. According to this theory, atoms are made up of positively charged protons, negatively charged electrons, and a neutral particle called a positron. The positron is responsible for keeping the protons and electrons in balance, making the atom electrically neutral.

2. How is positron theory different from other theories of atomic structure?

Positron theory differs from other theories of atomic structure, such as the Bohr model, in that it includes the existence of the positron. The Bohr model only considers the presence of protons and electrons in an atom, while positron theory takes into account the role of the positron in maintaining electrical neutrality.

3. What evidence supports the existence of positrons in atoms?

The existence of positrons in atoms has been confirmed through various experiments, such as the emission of gamma rays from positron-electron annihilation and the observation of positronium, a short-lived atom consisting of an electron and positron bound together. Additionally, positrons have been detected in particle accelerators and in natural sources such as cosmic rays.

4. Are there any practical applications of positron theory?

Yes, positron theory has practical applications in areas such as medical imaging and material science. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans, for example, use positrons to image the body and diagnose various diseases. In material science, positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to study the structure and defects in materials at the atomic level.

5. Are there any limitations to positron theory?

Like any scientific theory, positron theory has its limitations. It does not fully explain the behavior of atoms at the quantum level and is still being studied and refined by scientists. Additionally, positrons have not yet been observed in all elements of the periodic table, leading some to question the universality of positron theory in explaining all electric neutral atoms.

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