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Positrons and Antiprotons

  1. Aug 25, 2004 #1
    Quick question, I'm no good with anti-stuff. What are positrons and what are antiprotons and where could you find them?
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2004
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 25, 2004 #2

    chroot

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    They are the anti-particles of the electron and proton, respectively. You can find them generally nowhere but at particle accelerator laboratories.

    - Warren
     
  4. Aug 26, 2004 #3
    So they ARE proven, and not just theoretical? You know... cause I've never seen either... lol

    So then Anti-matter would have Positrons instead of electrons and anti-protons instead of protons, would neutrons be found in both? or?

    Concerning this, would you have all the same elements except... anti. You know like: anti-hydrogens and anti-heliums... are there any rules?

    Oh, and how would friction work with anti-matter? Would anti-matter only respond to gravity or what? Theoretically, would you end up commits, even planets made up of anti-matter?

    I'm really not into physics, but I'm just sort of interested.
     
  5. Aug 26, 2004 #4

    chroot

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    Anti-hydrogen has already been produced, at least according to the experimental evidence.

    Friction would work the same way for antimatter as it does for matter -- but don't put an antimatter book down on a matter table!

    Antimatter follows the same rules as matter as far as its interactions are concerned. Anti-electrons are charged and interact gravitationally and via the weak nuclear and electromagnetic forces, for example, just like electrons. The only difference is the electric charge.

    - Warren
     
  6. Aug 26, 2004 #5
    The EM, strong and gravitational interactions don't differentiate between matter and antimatter. While the charges would be reversed, it would not matter if all other charges are also reversed. One could live in an antimatter world and not know it if those were the only interactions. The weak nuclear force allows them to be differentiated. The difference is minute, but it can account for the observation that the known universe is predominantly composed of regular matter (positive protons and negative electrons).
     
  7. Aug 26, 2004 #6

    LURCH

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    In fact, the only thing making such objects unlikely is the dominance of matter in the universe. A planet made of antimatter could form, if it formed in some place where it never came into contact with normal matter.
     
  8. Aug 27, 2004 #7

    Mk

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    Also Anti-Protonic Helium, they took out one valence electron and stuck in a anti-proton. He++
     
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