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Potential Effect Transistor

  1. Jan 23, 2009 #1

    Is there any one, that can explain how a potential effect transistor, PET, works?

    I would like to know how the current is controled by changes in the potential.

  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 23, 2009 #2


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    Staff: Mentor

    Google and I've never heard of it. Can you provide a pointer to some technical information?
  4. Jan 23, 2009 #3
    New one on me also.

    Looks like it is just another name for a bipolar device. BJT. or perhaps a unijuction?
  5. Jan 23, 2009 #4
    Over the years many naming conventions have been used. The 2 basic types of transistors commonly in use today are the FET & the bjt. A search can turn up a wealth of info on both with equations & detailed diagrams. I've heard of the term PET used to describe non-FET devices like ujt's & bjt's. A FET uses capacitive displacement current to create an inversion layer of charge and create a conducting path. A bjt & ujt works by direct conduction, i.e. no insulating gate (MOSFET) or reverse biased junction (JFET).

    It isn't a good descriptive term. The best terms to describe modern FETs & bjt's at the semiconductor physics level is "minority carrier device" for a bjt, & "majority carrier device" for a FET.

    The "minority" & "majority" terms refer to the charge carrier distribution inside the semiconductor material. "PET" is not used in modern literature. I've heard the term used, but how it got coined is something I don't know. I believe it refers to creating a direct conducting channel by forward biasing a p-n junction (base-emitter) in a bjt (or ujt). A FET displaces charges to form a conducting channel. Does this make sense?

  6. Jan 26, 2009 #5
    Thanks for the answers.

    Now it makes sense.
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