Power of a pump

  1. 1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Water is pumped steadily out of a flooded basement at a speed of 5.0 m/s through a uniform hose of radius 1.0 cm. The hose passes out through a window 3.0m above the waterline. What is the power of the pump?


    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution

    I actually correctly solved the problem by taking advantage of the fact that
    [tex] P = \frac{\Delta W}{\Delta t }[/tex] which for us is [tex] P = \frac{\Delta m}{\Delta t} (gh + \frac{1}{2}v^{2})[/tex]

    My question is, if the force applied is constant, why can't I use [tex] P = \frac{F\Delta d}{\Delta t} [/tex] since it's a simple matter of finding the force and [tex]\frac{\Delta d}{\Delta t} = v[/tex] is given.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. hello duke, i think the force F you specify cannot be found without using Bernoulli equation. :smile:
     
  4. Yeah, I had actually found the force using an equation that is only good for static fluids, I'm going to see if using Bernoulli gets me the same result both ways. Thanks :)
     
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