Power of Transverse Wave: Derive Negative Sign

In summary, the power for a transverse wave travelling to the left is given by the equation P = -(Fu)1/2 x A2w2 Sin2(Kx+wt). This is derived from the concept of instantaneous power and is negative due to the opposite direction of the force in a transverse wave travelling to the left.
  • #1
jonny001
1
0
As we know Power for transverse wave is P=(Fu)1/2 x A2w2 Sin2(kx-wt) for the wave traveling in +x direction represented by Y=ACos(kx - wt) . However for wave traveling in -x direction is P= -(Fu)1/2 x A2w2 Sin2(Kx-wt) . (Note the negative sign)

The Problem is I am not able to derive this. In derivation I am not getting the negative sign (which i suppose to). Could someone please explain what is power in transverse wave traveling to left represented by Y=ACos(kx + wt).

The concept I am applying is Instantaneous power P=F.V. Please see the diagram.

307nhu9.jpg


I hope you can understand what i am saying:rolleyes:
 
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  • #2
The power for a transverse wave travelling to the left is given by the equation P = -(Fu)1/2 x A2w2 Sin2(Kx+wt). This equation is derived from the concept of instantaneous power, which states that the instantaneous power at any point in a wave is equal to the product of the force and the velocity of the wave at that point. Since the force in a transverse wave is proportional to the amplitude of the wave, and the velocity is equal to the product of the angular frequency and the wave number of the wave, we can express the power as P = FuA2w2Sin2(Kx+wt). Since the force in a transverse wave travelling to the left is in the opposite direction to the wave vector, the power must be negative. This is why there is a negative sign in the equation.
 
  • #3


Hello,

Thank you for your question. I understand your confusion about the negative sign in the power equation for a transverse wave traveling in the -x direction. Let's break down the derivation to help you understand where the negative sign comes from.

First, let's start with the general equation for instantaneous power for a transverse wave traveling in the +x direction: P = FV. As you mentioned, this is derived from the equation for power in general, which is P = FV cosθ, where θ is the angle between the force and velocity vectors.

Now, in the case of a transverse wave, the force is given by the tension in the string (F = T) and the velocity is given by the wave speed (V = v). Therefore, we can rewrite the equation as P = Tv cosθ. Since the wave is traveling in the +x direction, the angle between the force and velocity vectors is 0°, which means that cosθ = 1. So, the equation becomes P = Tv.

Next, we can substitute the equation for the velocity of a transverse wave in the equation for power: P = T(kA)w cos(kx - wt). Here, k is the wave number, A is the amplitude, w is the angular frequency, and x and t are the position and time variables, respectively.

If we simplify this equation, we get P = TkwA cos(kx - wt). Now, we can use the trigonometric identity cos(a-b) = cosacosb + sinasinb to rewrite this equation as P = TkwA (coskxcoswt + sinkxsinwt).

Finally, we can substitute the equation for the wave displacement (Y = Acos(kx - wt)) in the equation for power to get P = TkwAY (coskxcoswt + sinkxsinwt). This is the power equation for a transverse wave traveling in the +x direction.

Now, to derive the power equation for a wave traveling in the -x direction, we simply need to substitute the wave displacement equation (Y = Acos(kx + wt)) in the power equation and follow the same steps. When we do this, we get P = -TkwAY (coskxcoswt - sinkxsinwt). As you can see, the only difference between this equation and the one for a wave traveling in the +x direction is the negative
 

Related to Power of Transverse Wave: Derive Negative Sign

1. What is the power of a transverse wave?

The power of a transverse wave is the rate at which energy is transferred through the wave. It is measured in watts (W) and is directly proportional to the amplitude squared and the frequency of the wave.

2. How is the power of a transverse wave derived?

The power of a transverse wave can be derived by considering the energy of a wave as it travels through a medium. The energy is equal to the product of the amplitude squared and the frequency. By taking the derivative of this equation with respect to time, we can find the rate of change of energy or the power of the wave.

3. Why is the negative sign used in the derivation of the power of a transverse wave?

The negative sign in the derivation of the power of a transverse wave is used to indicate that the energy is being transferred in the opposite direction of the wave's propagation. This is due to the fact that the wave itself is a disturbance in the medium, and the energy is being carried by the disturbance as it moves through the medium.

4. What does a negative power value indicate?

A negative power value indicates that the energy is being dissipated or lost as the wave travels through the medium. This can occur due to factors such as friction, air resistance, or other forms of energy conversion.

5. How does the power of a transverse wave relate to its intensity?

The power of a transverse wave is directly proportional to its intensity. Intensity is the amount of energy passing through a unit area per unit time and is measured in watts per square meter (W/m2). Therefore, as the power of a wave increases, so does its intensity.

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