Presidential Candidates 2008

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Astronuc
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McCain to launch 2008 exploratory panel
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061110/ap_on_el_pr/mccain2008 [Broken]
WASHINGTON - Sen. John McCain, considered the front-runner for the 2008 Republican presidential nomination, intends to launch an exploratory committee next week, GOP officials said Friday.

The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity to avoid pre-empting a public statement from the four-term Arizona senator.

McCain, the GOP maverick who unsuccessfully sought his party's nomination in 2000, already has opened a bank account for the committee, one official said.

"The senator has made no decision about running for president," said Eileen McMenamin, a McCain spokeswoman.

Aides to McCain say the senator will discuss a presidential bid with his family over the Christmas holiday.

McCain is a former Navy pilot who was a prisoner of war in Vietnam. He was elected to the Senate in 1986, and served in the House for four years before that.

If McCain were to run, he would turn 72 on Aug. 29, 2008, at the height of the campaign. Only President Reagan was older — 73 at the start of his second term. McCain's health could be another issue. The senator has had several cancerous lesions removed from his skin.

Since losing to Bush in 2000, McCain has alternately challenged and embraced the president, building an independent reputation who isn't afraid to speak his mind. At the same time, he's sought to mend fences with conservatives he alienated in his first presidential run.

After Republicans lost control of both the House and Senate on Tuesday, McCain called for a return to the conservative principles he said make up the foundations of the Republican Party.

"We came to Washington to change government and government changed us," lamented McCain. "We departed rather tragically from our conservative principles."

. . . .
Hmmm. http://www.straighttalkamerica.com/ Hmmmm.


Anyway, this announcement comes days after:

Iowa Democrat jumps in presidential race
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20061109/pl_nm/usa_elections_vilsack_dc_1 [Broken]
DES MOINES, Iowa (Reuters) - Democratic Gov. Tom Vilsack of Iowa jumped into the 2008 U.S. presidential race on Thursday, saying voters want a new direction for the country "and that's what I intend to do as president."

Vilsack, a two-term governor who is leaving office this year to concentrate on his White House bid, stressed his moderate record and a bipartisan approach on education, economic development and health care as governor of Iowa.

"Americans sent a clear message on Tuesday. They want leaders who will take this country in a new direction," Vilsack said. "They want leaders who share their values, understand their needs and respect their intelligence.

"That's what I've done as governor of Iowa, and that's what I intend to do as president," he said."

Vilsack, chairman of the centrist Democratic Leadership Council, has been traveling the country laying the groundwork for his campaign for a year.
But everyone is waiting for Hillary to step into the ring. :rolleyes:

The slogan pushed by the Democrats during the campaign was "A New Direction for America". It may have captured the imagination of the voters, but just how it translates into reality will define the remaining two years of the Bush presidency - as well as the Democrats' prospects in the 2008 presidential election.

"The storm finally broke, and we can see blue again," said Democratic strategist Donna Brazil, who ran Al Gore's unsuccessful run for the presidency in 2000. But while the skies may have cleared for the Democratic party, victory - and the power that comes with it - may muddy the field for 2008.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/midterms2006/story/0,,1942920,00.html
 
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  • #2
Astronuc
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Well, it's not yet Thanksgiving and the national elections (2006) just finished less than 5 days ago - and already politicians are lining up for the Presidential Nomination in 2008 - 103 weeks away. Ugh! ::)

So the governor of Iowa, Democract Tom Vilsack, has already announced his candidacy on Friday, Nov 10 -
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061110/ap_on_el_pr/democrats2008_5 [Broken]

Now -
Democratic Sen. Joe Biden reaffirmed his intention to seek his party's nomination, though an announcement about establishing an exploratory committee probably will not come until early next year.

The anticipated wide-open campaign — for the first time since the 1928 race, the field will not include a sitting president or vice president — lost one possible participant when Sen. Russ Feingold, D-Wis., decided against a long-shot run. [Feingold, 53, is an outspoken opponent of the Iraq war, the Patriot Act and other Bush administration policies. His chances will come later.]

. . . .

The 63-year-old Biden, who is line to take over as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, also ran for president before, dropping from the 1988 race after it became known he had lifted a portion of a speech from a British politician without attribution.

Biden, first elected to the Senate in 1972, said Sunday he would address the issue of an exploratory committee early in 2007. "I still plan on running. I haven't, quite frankly, thought through all of the ... mechanics of it at this point in terms of when to announce setting up an exploratory committee, but I plan on doing that," he said. [He's already behind]

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York is widely considered the front-runner. Others mentioned include Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts [Don't do it John], the 2004 nominee; former Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina, the vice presidential nominee two years ago; Sens. Barack Obama of Illinois, Evan Bayh of Indiana and Christopher Dodd of Connecticut [Chris - you're too old]; and New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson [Think - DOE - Los Alamos].

Republicans talked about for 2008 are Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney; Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee; Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani. [Mike Huckabee leads this group]

GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter of California, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, said last month he is forming an exploratory committee.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061112/ap_on_el_pr/white_house2008 [Broken]

It's not even Christmas yet! We've still got 6 weeks left in 2006. What's the rush?

Are they afraid the country is going somewhere between now and then?

Give us a break!

There should be a two month moratorium on campaigns after each national election, where any politician who mentions the word is automatically disqualified for two years. Do you think they could keep their mouths under control?
 
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  • #3
turbo
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Astronuc said:
It's not even Christmas yet! We've still got 6 weeks left in 2006. What's the rush?
It is emblematic of the problem we have with our elections being dominated by big money interests. The candidate who "shops around" for support and declares early locks in campaign money that helps him/her and at the same time reduces the chance that opponents will get donations as large from those same sources. Our government will continue to be sold to the highest bidder unless we ban non-personal contributions and place severe caps on those, so the middle-class doesn't get locked out of the process. I would prefer publicly-financed campaigns, but leadership of both of the major parties feel that would reduce their clout with the candidates, and they will fight it tooth and nail. Currently, party leaders have control of vast pools of campaign money to swing to favored candidates, so that is one VERY big stick.
 
  • #4
Astronuc
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WASHINGTON, Dec. 25 — On Thursday, John Edwards is planning to announce what has been clear to much of the world since the end of the last presidential election: He is running for president in 2008. A similar declaration is expected shortly from Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts, followed, in all probability, by Senators Hillary Rodham Clinton, Barack Obama and John McCain.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/27/us/politics/27edwards.html

Biden Opposes a Troop Increase in Iraq, Foreshadowing a Fight With the Bush Administration
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/27/washington/27diplo.html
WASHINGTON, Dec. 26 — Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware, the incoming chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, on Tuesday rejected a troop increase for Iraq, foreshadowing what could be a contentious fight between the Bush administration and Congress.

Mr. Biden, a Democrat, announced that he would begin hearings on Iraq on Jan. 9 and expected high-ranking officials, including Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, to appear.

As President Bush flew to his Texas ranch on Tuesday, a spokesman for the National Security Council urged the senator to wait for Mr. Bush to present his new Iraq policy next month before passing judgment.

“President Bush will talk soon to our troops, the American people and Iraqis about a new way forward for Iraq that will lead to a democratic, unified country that can govern, defend and sustain itself,” said Gordon Johndroe, the council spokesman.
Biden Plots His Own Plan for Iraq Troop Levels
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6684823

Some call for more troops, and others reject that idea. It seem more troops are necessary for control and stability, but the risk is inflaming the negative feelings on part of the Iraqis who resent the US occupation.
 
  • #5
BobG
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WASHINGTON, Dec. 25 — On Thursday, John Edwards is planning to announce what has been clear to much of the world since the end of the last presidential election: He is running for president in 2008. A similar declaration is expected shortly from Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts, followed, in all probability, by Senators Hillary Rodham Clinton, Barack Obama and John McCain.
It doesn't bother anybody that Edwards and Romney have won a single election each? Or that Clinton and Obama each only have two wins?

Normal experience levels for 20th century presidents is around 5 elections.

Then again, Bush only had two elections to his credit before 2000, so experience isn't essential.

And there are other exceptions:

We've had three generals whose first election was a presidential election that they won. Not only was Zachary Taylor's run for President the first political office he ever ran for, it was the first election he ever voted in. (Eisenhower and Grant were the other two generals in their first election ever).

William Taft spent virtually his entire political career in appointed positions, so his first election was a presidential election even though he had over 20 years experience in government.

Herbert Hoover's first election was the 1928 presidential election. He was an engineer that wound up directing a lot of successful government projects and his response to the 1927 Mississippi River flood gave him a reputation similar to Giuliani's.

Woodrow Wilson spent most of his life as an academic writing about American government. In fact, at one point he was an advocate for dissolving the Constitution and going to a parliamentary form of government. His presidential election was his second election.
 
  • #6
Astronuc
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Sen. Obama Launches White House Bid
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) -- Barack Obama announced his bid for president Saturday, a black man evoking Abraham Lincoln's ability to unite a nation and a Democrat portraying himself as a fresh face capable of leading a new generation.

"Let us transform this nation," he told thousands shivering in the cold at the campaign's kickoff.

Obama, 45, is the youngest candidate in the Democrats' 2008 primary field dominated by front-runner Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton and filled with more experienced lawmakers. In an address from the state capital where he began his elective career 10 years ago, the first-term U.S. senator sought to distinguish himself as a staunch opponent of the Iraq war and a White House hopeful whose lack of political experience is an asset.

"I know I haven't spent a lot of time learning the ways of Washington. But I've been there long enough to know that the ways of Washington must change," Obama said to some of the loudest applause of his 20-minute speech.
But would things change?

Obama Enters 2008 Presidential Race
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7341115
Weekend Edition Saturday, February 10, 2007 · Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) tells a crowd at the Illinois state capital that he is running for the White House in 2008.

The first-term U.S. senator began his elected life at the state legislature 10 years ago.

If elected president, Obama would be the first black person to hold the nation's highest office.
Apparently Obama has lined up a lot of cash already - from the standard lobbying and contributing groups!

Obama Already Plugged into Political Money Machine
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7338511
Weekend Edition Saturday, February 10, 2007 · In his run for the White House, Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) is just as dependent on attracting campaign money as his opponents.

A look at Obama's list of political contributors offers few surprises. It is largely a mainstream group of regular contributors to Washington politicians.

Ken Silverstein says that, based on his contributors, Obama does not look like a politician preparing to challenge the status quo.!
Interesting times ahead.
 
  • #7
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There are a lot of Presidential Candidates trying to challenge the status quo. Wonder who will fail.
 
  • #8
Ivan Seeking
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I used to like McCain but he has turned completely wishy-washy. He now courts the extreme religious groups that he once denounced.

For me, that pretty much does it for the Repulicans.
 
  • #9
Astronuc
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Stop Him Before He Gets More Experience :rofl:

Commentary by Frank Rich, NY Times, OP-Ed, Feb 11, 2007

AS the official Barack Obama rollout reaches its planned climax on “60 Minutes” tonight, we’ll learn if he has the star power to upstage Anna Nicole Smith. But at least one rap against him can promptly be laid to rest: his lack of experience. If time in the United States Senate is what counts for presidential seasoning, maybe his two years’ worth is already too much. Better he get out now, before there’s another embarrassing nonvote on a nonbinding measure about what will soon be a four-year-old war.

History is going to look back and laugh at last week’s farce, with the Virginia Republican John Warner voting to kill a debate on his own anti-surge resolution and the West Virginia Democrat Robert Byrd seizing the occasion for an hourlong soliloquy on coal mining. As the Senate pleasured itself with parliamentary one-upmanship, the rate of American casualties in Iraq reached a new high.

The day after the resolution debacle, I spoke with Senator Obama about the war and about his candidacy. Since we talked by phone, I can’t swear he was clean, but he was definitely articulate. He doesn’t yet sound as completely scripted as his opponents — though some talking-point-itis is creeping in — and he isn’t remotely defensive as he shrugs off the race contretemps du jour prompted by his White House run. Not that he’s all sweetness and light. “If the criterion is how long you’ve been in Washington, then we should just go ahead and assign Joe Biden or Chris Dodd the nomination,” he said. “What people are looking for is judgment.”

What Mr. Obama did not have to say is that he had the judgment about Iraq that his rivals lacked. As an Illinois state senator with no access to intelligence reports, he recognized in October 2002 that administration claims of Saddam’s “imminent and direct threat to the United States” were hype and foresaw that an American occupation of Iraq would be of “undetermined length, at undetermined cost, with undetermined consequences.” Nor can he be pilloried as soft on terrorism by the Cheney-Lieberman axis of neo-McCarthyism. “I don’t oppose all wars,” he said in the same Chicago speech. “What I am opposed to is a dumb war.
Say what?! :rolleyes:

He has introduced his own end-the-war plan that goes beyond a split-the-difference condemnation of the current escalation.
Hmmm.

Washington’s conventional wisdom has it that the worse things go in the war, the more voters will want to stick with the tried and true: Clinton, McCain, Giuliani. But as Mr. Obama reminds us, “Nobody had better Washington résumés than Dick Cheney or Donald Rumsfeld.” In the wake of the catastrophe they and their enablers in both parties have made, the inexperienced should have a crack at inheriting the earth, especially if they’re clean.
Are we in trouble or what?
 
  • #10
Astronuc
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Some Arizona Republicans Work Against McCain
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7667067
Day to Day, March 1, 2007 · Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) has long been considered the front-runner to win the Republican presidential nomination next year. But recent polls indicate a drop in support among fellow Republicans. And some GOP activists in his home state of Arizona have been working to erode his support even further.
Conservatives Focus Their Energies on 2008
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7703371
All Things Considered, March 3, 2007 · Conservative activists came to Washington this week for the annual Conservative Political Action Conference, C-PAC for short. . . . .

Each of the top-three GOP contenders — Rudy Giuliani, John McCain and Mitt Romney — faces questions about how conservative they really are.

But so far, candidates with unquestioned conservative credentials, such as Kansas Sen. Sam Brownback and California Rep. Duncan Hunter, are considered real longshots for the Republican presidential nomination.
GOP Candidates Make Rounds at Convention
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7706146

Meanwhile, down south -

Dem Powerhouses Mark Selma's Bloody Sunday
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7706143
Obama and Clinton gave dueling speeches at two churches just a block apart Sunday morning in Selma, Ala. The presidential contenders will later be joined by former president Bill Clinton in a march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in commemoration of the 1965 voting-rights march.
Obama Gains Momentum as Selma Date Nears
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7692211
 
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  • #11
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I think Romney has too much baggage. Mormons are still considered cultists by too many. I know many, some, including a number of the scientists who contributed to my education, are level headed, community spirited, and just plain likeable, good folk. Others are nuts. I suppose the same could be said of catholics, baptists, jewish, or even those of muslim leanings. But I suspect Giuliana will take the lead here soon. I'll watch and wistfully send Dennis 10 bucks if he promises to stay out of it on the demo side.
 
  • #13
verty
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New person, same old story.
 
  • #14
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i can not STAND hillary clintoon. she is the biggest phony in the world. if it comes down to hillary vs. mccain, i would vote for mccain in a heartbeat. obama is wayyyyyyyyy better than hillary clintoon. at least mccain is a somewhat moderate.



bush, clinton, bush, clinton?

according to the laws of our forefathers anyone can become president right???????


yeah right LOL
 
  • #15
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Any fondness fro Hillary evaporated when she supported the Israel fence building last year. A 3 digit IQ would be welcome in the white house after 8 yrs of bush, and she has smarts no doubt of that, just no charisma--maybe why she married Bill.
 
  • #16
Astronuc
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Rudy Giuliani, John McCain and Mitt Romney - I think are listed in order of likelihood of getting the nomination for Republican candidate. Giuliani has the aura of being the mayor of NYCity who took the helm when the WTC was attacked. I think McCain has alienated some/many social conservatives.


It will be interesting to see who leads the Democrat nomination - Obama or Clinton. I think Clinton has a lot of baggage, but she has a strong core of support.
 
  • #17
Ivan Seeking
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LYNCHBURG, Va. — Newt Gingrich's admission of an extramarital affair as he pursued President Clinton's impeachment in the Monica Lewinsky scandal has won praise from another conservative Christian leader: the Rev. Jerry Falwell.[continued]
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/politics/4617595.html [Broken]

It seems that the religious right is hoping to reclaim ground using their former champion.

Good choice. Stick with that one.
 
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  • #18
Astronuc
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Newt Gingrich's admission of an extramarital affair as he pursued President Clinton's impeachment in the Monica Lewinsky scandal has won praise from another conservative Christian leader: the Rev. Jerry Falwell.
Well, I am activating my Sub-Etha Sesomatic thumb, and I have my towel with me at all times. If I'm lucky, I won't be around during 2008, and preferably will be a long way away where the EM radiation from earth will never reach. :grumpy:
 
  • #19
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Rudy Giuliani, John McCain and Mitt Romney - I think are listed in order of likelihood of getting the nomination for Republican candidate. Giuliani has the aura of being the mayor of NYCity who took the helm when the WTC was attacked. I think McCain has alienated some/many social conservatives.


It will be interesting to see who leads the Democrat nomination - Obama or Clinton. I think Clinton has a lot of baggage, but she has a strong core of support.
Thats why i'm betting on Giuliani--calm, bold leader who made the right moves at the right time--never mind the facts, tuff on blood sucking unions, almost as good as bringing reagan back from the dead. McCain will die of flip-flop, and while the country might elect a woman, or even a black, don't see a Mormon in the near future.
I don't know where that gadgt will take you, but if Giuliani or McCain win, I'm taking an extended vacation in the southern hem.
 
  • #20
drankin
To be honest, there are plenty of candidates but no leaders. There is absolutely noone that I could stand behind right now. Noone that inspires me, or maybe I'm just getting old and tired of the same political game...
 
  • #21
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Agreed. The only exception I know of is Dennis Kucnovich whose notions about things still inspire hope. Sadly there is a multivariant calculus at work that keeps anyone whose view is off the main by more than a few degrees, even if it is as often right vs left that guarentees more of the lackluster same. People wnat McDonalds. This month the Big mac with tobasco, next month with avocado. Still an almost flavorless Bigmac.
 
  • #22
Astronuc
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there are plenty of candidates but no leaders.
Interesting this comment is. I heard a similar comment yesterday from the guy from whom I bought a new set of tires.

How is it that the US is in this situation? How do we end up with a slate of candidates who lack the leadership qualities, which inspire/instill a sense of confidence? How or why do we settle for such mediocrity, or less?

G.O.P. Voters Voice Anxieties on Party’s Fate
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/13/us/politics/13poll.html

After years of political dominance, Republican voters now view their party as divided and say they are not satisfied with the choice of candidates seeking the Republican presidential nomination in 2008, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll.

In a survey that brought to life the party’s anxieties about keeping the White House, Republicans said they were concerned that their party had drifted from the principles of Ronald Reagan, its most popular figure of the past 50 years.

Forty percent of Republicans said they expected Democrats to take control of the White House next year, compared with 46 percent who said they believed a Republican would win. Just 12 percent of Democrats said they thought the opposing party would win the White House.

Even as Republican voters continued to support President Bush and the war in Iraq, including the recent increase in the number of American troops deployed there, they said a candidate who backed Mr. Bush’s war policies would be at a decided disadvantage in 2008. And they suggested that they were open to supporting a candidate who broke with the president on a crucial aspect of his Iraq strategy.

Asked what was more important to them in a nominee, a commitment to stay in Iraq until the United States succeeds or flexibility about when to withdraw, 58 percent of self-identified Republican primary voters said flexibility versus 39 percent who said a commitment to stay. The three leading Republican candidates are strong supporters of the war and the increase in American troops there.

The poll, which was designed to survey more Republicans than it normally would to provide a better statistical look at the mood of the party, found signs that members were uneasy about its future.

. . . . <continued>
 
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  • #23
turbo
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Interesting this comment is. I heard a similar comment yesterday from the guy from whom I bought a new set of tires.

How is it that the US is in this situation? How do we end up with a slate of candidates who lack the leadership qualities, which inspire/instill a sense of confidence? How or why do we settle for such mediocrity, or less?
Our government is held hostage by an entrenched 2-party system that is corrupt and is dedicated to preserving the status quo for their wealthy backers. The difference between the Republican and Democratic parties is no greater than the difference between Coke and Pepsi, or Time and Newsweek. This system guarantees that real independent-thinking, caring leaders are marginalized. We need some progressive populist leaders in this country to turn things around, improve access to health care and education and reverse the ever-widening gap between the wealthy the wage-earners. It will not happen until we force election reforms and reduce the influence of the two major parties by drying up their flow of donations.
 
  • #24
Astronuc
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Red State Update: Who's Running For President Now?

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
 
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